Fine scale patterns of migration and gene flow in the endangered mound spring snail, Fonscochlea accepta (Mollusca : Hydrobiidae) in arid Australia

Wilmer, Jessica Worthington and Wilcox, Chris (2007) Fine scale patterns of migration and gene flow in the endangered mound spring snail, Fonscochlea accepta (Mollusca : Hydrobiidae) in arid Australia. Conservation Genetics, 8 3: 617-628. doi:10.1007/s10592-006-9206-x


Author Wilmer, Jessica Worthington
Wilcox, Chris
Title Fine scale patterns of migration and gene flow in the endangered mound spring snail, Fonscochlea accepta (Mollusca : Hydrobiidae) in arid Australia
Formatted title
Fine scale patterns of migration and gene flow in the endangered mound spring snail, Fonscochlea accepta (Mollusca:Hydrobiidae) in arid Australia
Journal name Conservation Genetics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1566-0621
1572-9737
Publication date 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10592-006-9206-x
Volume 8
Issue 3
Start page 617
End page 628
Total pages 12
Place of publication Netherlands
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Subject 0604 Genetics
Abstract Naturally patchy ecosystems are models for other systems currently undergoing anthropogenic habitat fragmentation. Understanding patterns of gene flow in these model systems can help us manage species and ecosystems threatened by human impacts. The mound springs of central Australia represent such a natural model ecosystem, supporting a unique aquatic fauna distributed within an inhospitable arid landscape. Moreover, these springs are being impacted by over extraction of groundwater, providing a unique opportunity to look at dispersal in a patchy habitat that is changing. The present study represents the first fine scale analysis of gene flow under different scenarios of habitat connectivity for the endangered mound spring snail, Fonscochlea accepta. Within a single spring group pairwise estimates of F-ST between springs were very low (ave 0.015) with no association found between genetic distance and a series of geographical distance matrices based on the degree of habitat connectivity among the springs: results implying unstructured dispersal and limited population isolation. However, results from Bayesian assignment tests showed that on average approximately 97% of snails were assigned to their spring of origin. In a preliminary analysis at broader geographic scales (among spring groups) the results from F-ST estimates, Mantel correlation analyses and assignment tests all suggest much stronger and geographically correlated population structuring. While varying results from F-statistics and Bayesian analyses stem from the different information they utilise, together they provide data on contemporary and historical estimates of gene flow and the influence of landscape dynamics on the spatial genetic patterning of the springs.
Keyword Biodiversity Conservation
Genetics & Heredity
Hydrobiidae
Artesian mound springs
microsatellites
migration
gene flow
Great Artesian Basin
Multilocus Genotype Data
Fresh-water Snails
Population-structure
South-australia
Aquatic Snails
Loci
Differentiation
Inference
Tests
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 18 Feb 2008, 17:05:09 EST