Low levels of ambient air pollution during pregnancy and fetal growth among term neonates in Brisbane, Australia

Hansen, Craig, Neller, Anne, Williams, Gail and Simpson, Rod (2007) Low levels of ambient air pollution during pregnancy and fetal growth among term neonates in Brisbane, Australia. Environmental Research, 103 3: 383-389. doi:10.1016/j.envres.2006.06.010


Author Hansen, Craig
Neller, Anne
Williams, Gail
Simpson, Rod
Title Low levels of ambient air pollution during pregnancy and fetal growth among term neonates in Brisbane, Australia
Journal name Environmental Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0013-9351
Publication date 2007-03
Year available 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.envres.2006.06.010
Volume 103
Issue 3
Start page 383
End page 389
Total pages 7
Editor E. K. Silbergeld
Place of publication San Diego, C.A. U.S.A.
Publisher Academic Press Inc Elsevier Science
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject C1
321299 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
730299 Public health not elsewhere classified
Abstract There is mounting evidence that maternal exposure to ambient air pollution during pregnancy is associated with adverse birth outcomes. We examined birth weight and small for gestational age (SGA < 10th percentile for age and gender) among 26,617 singleton full-term births in Brisbane, Australia (July 2000-June 2003), in relation to ambient pollution during pregnancy. We also examined head circumference (HC) and crown-heel length (CHL) among a sub-sample (n = 21,432) of the term neonates. Maternal exposure to PM10, visibility reducing particles (bsp), O-3 and NO2 was assessed by calculating average exposure estimates over months and trimesters of pregnancy based on a citywide average of the pollutants. Linear and logistic regression models were employed to examine the effect of these pollutants on the birth outcomes after adjusting for potential confounders and season of birth. The regression coefficients were based on an inter-quartile range (IQR) increase in exposure as well as quartiles of exposure with the lowest used as a reference category. Trimester- and monthly specific exposures to all pollutants were not significantly associated with a reduction in either birth weight or HC, or an increased risk of SGA. An IQR increase in NO2 during the third trimester was associated with a reduction in CHL (beta = -0.15cm, 95% CI -0.25 to -0.05cm) and this was concentrated around exposure during month nine. No other pollutants were associated with a reduction in CHL. In conclusion, there was no strong evidence suggesting that ambient air pollution during pregnancy is associated with sub-optimal fetal growth in Brisbane. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Keyword Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
air pollution
pregnancy
birth weight
head circumference
crown-heel length
small for gestational age
Low-birth-weight
Hospital Admissions
Daily Mortality
Children Born
Exposure
Outcomes
Association
California
Sydney
Pollutants
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Mon, 18 Feb 2008, 16:35:15 EST