Explaining the convergence of male and female smoking prevalence in Australia

Morley, Katherine I. and Hall, Wayne D. (2008) Explaining the convergence of male and female smoking prevalence in Australia. Addiction, 103 3: 487-495. doi:10.1111/j.1360-0443.2007.02087.x

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Author Morley, Katherine I.
Hall, Wayne D.
Title Explaining the convergence of male and female smoking prevalence in Australia
Journal name Addiction   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0965-2140
1360-0443
Publication date 2008-03
Year available 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2007.02087.x
Open Access Status
Volume 103
Issue 3
Start page 487
End page 495
Total pages 8
Editor R. West
T. Babor
R. West
Place of publication Abingdon, England
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject 321202 Epidemiology
C1
730205 Substance abuse
920414 Substance Abuse
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Formatted abstract
Objective
To examine changes in age of tobacco experimentation and progression to daily smoking in men and women between birth cohorts that differ in exposure to public health programmes that aim to discourage smoking.

Design
Analysis of national cross-sectional household surveys of smoking patterns, conducted in Australia in 2001 and 2004.

Setting and participants

Australian adults aged 22 years and over in 2001 and 2004 who responded to the National Drug Strategy Household Survey.

Main outcome measures
Prevalence of tobacco experimentation and progression to daily smoking by age 21, estimated by sex and birth cohort. Odds of tobacco experimentation and progression to daily smoking by age 21 estimated by sex for each birth cohort, with corrections for the effects of ‘forward telescoping’ in recalling age of use.

Results

Sex differences in smoking prevalence are smaller in younger birth cohorts. Tobacco experimentation has increased among women, while progression to daily smoking has decreased among men.

Conclusions
Sex differences in smoking experimentation and progression to daily smoking have decreased in younger birth cohorts. However, a significant proportion of younger males and females continue to experiment with tobacco and become daily smokers despite strong public health efforts to discourage smoking. More research is needed to determine why sex differences in smoking behaviour are not evident in younger birth cohorts.
Keyword Prevalence
Sex Differences
Smoking
Age-of-onset
Cigarette-smoking
Mortality
Initiation
Cessation
Tobacco
Disease
Women
Patterns
Behavior
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 07 Feb 2008, 14:55:17 EST by Coral Gartner on behalf of School of Public Health