Mutation of the maturase lipoprotein attenuates the virulence of Streptococcus equi to a greater extent than does loss of general lipoprotein lipidation

Hamilton, Andrea, Robinson, Carl, Sutcliffe, Iain C., Slater, Josh, Maskell, Duncan J., Davis-Poynter, Nick, Smith, Ken, Waller, Andrew and Harrington, Dean J. (2006) Mutation of the maturase lipoprotein attenuates the virulence of Streptococcus equi to a greater extent than does loss of general lipoprotein lipidation. Infection And Immunity, 74 12: 6907-6919. doi:10.1128/IAI.01116-06

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ123996_OA.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 447.91KB 0

Author Hamilton, Andrea
Robinson, Carl
Sutcliffe, Iain C.
Slater, Josh
Maskell, Duncan J.
Davis-Poynter, Nick
Smith, Ken
Waller, Andrew
Harrington, Dean J.
Title Mutation of the maturase lipoprotein attenuates the virulence of Streptococcus equi to a greater extent than does loss of general lipoprotein lipidation
Formatted title
Mutation of the maturase lipoprotein attenuates the virulence of Streptococcus equi to a greater extent than does loss of general lipoprotein lipidation
Journal name Infection And Immunity   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1098-5522
1070-6313
Publication date 2006-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1128/IAI.01116-06
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 74
Issue 12
Start page 6907
End page 6919
Total pages 13
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Society for Microbiology
Language eng
Abstract Streptococcus equi is the causative agent of strangles, a prevalent and highly contagious disease of horses. Despite the animal suffering and economic burden associated with strangles, little is known about the molecular basis of S. equi virulence. Here we have investigated the contributions of a specific lipoprotein and the general lipoprotein processing pathway to the abilities of S. equi to colonize equine epithelial tissues in vitro and to cause disease in both a mouse model and the natural host in vivo. Colonization of air interface organ cultures after they were inoculated with a mutant strain deficient in the maturase lipoprotein (Delta prtM(138-213), with a deletion of nucleotides 138 to 213) was significantly less than that for cultures infected with wild-type S. equi strain 4047 or a mutant strain that was unable to lipidate preprolipoproteins (Delta lgt(190-685)). Moreover, mucus production was significantly greater in both wild-type-infected and Delta lgt(190-685)-infected organ cultures. Both mutants were significantly attenuated compared with the wild-type strain in a mouse model of strangles, although 2 of 30 mice infected with the Delta lgt(190-685) mutant did still exhibit signs of disease. In contrast, only the Delta prtM(138-213) mutant was significantly attenuated in a pony infection study, with 0 of 5 infected ponies exhibiting pathological signs of strangles compared with 4 of 4 infected with the wild-type and 3 of 5 infected with the Delta lgt(190-685) mutant. We believe that this is the first study to evaluate the contribution of lipoproteins to the virulence of a gram-positive pathogen in its natural host. These data suggest that the PrtM lipoprotein is a potential vaccine candidate, and further investigation of its activity and its substrate(s) are warranted.
Keyword Immunology
Infectious diseases
Gram-positive bacteria
Complete genome sequence
Ii Signal peptidase
Bacillus-subtilis
Lactococcus-lactis
Molecular-basis
Alpha-amylase
Group-a
Protein
Identification
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Clinical Medical Virology Centre Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 35 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 34 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 25 Jan 2008, 16:59:37 EST