Hydraulics of stepped chutes: The transition flow. By H. Chanson and Luke Toombes:Reply by the Authors

Chanson, Hubert and Toombes, Luke (2007) Hydraulics of stepped chutes: The transition flow. By H. Chanson and Luke Toombes:Reply by the Authors. Journal of Hydraulic Research, 45 1: 141-141. doi:10.1080/00221686.2007.9521754

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Author Chanson, Hubert
Toombes, Luke
Title Hydraulics of stepped chutes: The transition flow. By H. Chanson and Luke Toombes:Reply by the Authors
Journal name Journal of Hydraulic Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-1686
Publication date 2007-02-02
Sub-type Discussion - responses, round table/panel discussions, Q&A, reply
DOI 10.1080/00221686.2007.9521754
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 45
Issue 1
Start page 141
End page 141
Total pages 1
Place of publication Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, U.K.
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Subject 290000 Engineering and Technology
290800 Civil Engineering
290802 Water and Sanitary Engineering
Formatted abstract
(Discussion by T. Harianto and R.Hughes; and Reply by Authors)

It is acknowledged the comment on flow at an abrupt drop with a sill and a kind of oscillating jump flow. This flow pattern was studied by numerous researchers and important contributions included OHTSU and YASUDA (1991), MOSSA et al. (2003) and MOSSA (1999). Such a flow instability is a completely different process from transition flow on stepped chutes. The proposed development is a welcome attempt to comprehend the complexity of stepped chute flows, but the outcome is highly arguable. In large laboratory models and prototype channels, stepped chute flows are highly turbulent. It is grossly incorrect to assume zero vorticity in any flow regime. Further the pseudo-mathematical development is based upon incorrect assumptions, namely quasi-atmospheric pressures, zero flow resistance and no streamline curvature ! None of the assumptions are correct in stepped channel flows. Stepped spillways are well known for their high rate of energy dissipation and large flow resistance for all flow regimes (e.g. CHANSON 2001, CHANSON et al. 2002), while the discussers' sketch emphasised a strong streamline curvature at step edges.
Keyword Stepped spillways
Transition fow regime
Abrupt drop
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes The full biliographic details are : CHANSON, H., and TOOMBES, L. (2007). "Hydraulics of Stepped Chutes: the Transition Flow. Closure." Journal of Hydraulic Research, IAHR, Vol. 45, No. 1, p. 141 (ISSN 0022-1686). The orignal journal article as : CHANSON, H., and TOOMBES, L. (2004). "Hydraulics of Stepped Chutes: the Transition Flow." Journal of Hydraulic Research, IAHR, Vol. 42, No. 1, pp. 43-54 (ISSN 0022-1686).

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Discussion - responses, round table/panel discussions, Q&A, reply
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Created: Fri, 02 Feb 2007, 18:07:32 EST by Hubert Chanson on behalf of School of Civil Engineering