The mechanics of yield stress fluids: similarities, specificities and open questions

Coussot, P. (2007). The mechanics of yield stress fluids: similarities, specificities and open questions. In: Peter Jacobs, Tim McIntyre, Matthew Cleary, David Buttsworth, David Mee, Rose Clements, Richard Morgan and Charles Lemckert, 16th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference (AFMC). 16th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference (AFMC), Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia, (54-58). 3-7 December, 2007.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
coussot_afmc_16_07.pdf Conference paper application/pdf 420.10KB 728

Author Coussot, P.
Title of paper The mechanics of yield stress fluids: similarities, specificities and open questions
Conference name 16th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference (AFMC)
Conference location Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
Conference dates 3-7 December, 2007
Proceedings title 16th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference (AFMC)
Place of Publication Brisbane, Australia
Publisher School of Engineering, The University of Queensland
Publication Year 2007
Year available 2007
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 978-1-864998-94-8
Editor Peter Jacobs
Tim McIntyre
Matthew Cleary
David Buttsworth
David Mee
Rose Clements
Richard Morgan
Charles Lemckert
Start page 54
End page 58
Total pages 5
Collection year 2007
Language eng
Abstract/Summary A wide range of materials encountered in our everyday life, such as clay suspensions, foams, concentrated emulsions, cement pastes, paints, glues, purees, creams, can flow like simple liquids under certain conditions and behave like solids under other conditions. This is the specificity of yield stress fluids which makes them so useful in various applications. In their “liquid regime” these materials exhibit typical flow properties of simple fluids such as a transition to turbulence, the roll wave instability, the hydraulic jump, etc. The specific properties occur when the solid regime is involved, either in a part of the material or as a whole. In that case one may for example observe plug flow, flow stoppage over steep slopes, no sedimentation of dense particles, cylindrical drips, Saffman-Taylor instability at vanishing velocity, etc. In addition yield stress fluids are often thixotropic, i.e. their viscosity may vary in time. The physical origin of this phenomenon and the mechanical model appropriate for describing it remain the most challenging aspects of these fluids.
Subjects 240502 Fluid Physics
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 03 Jan 2008, 16:01:54 EST by Belinda Weaver on behalf of School of Engineering