Structural Change, Leadership and School Effectiveness/Improvement: Perspectives from South Africa

Fleisch, Brahm and Christie, Pamela (2004) Structural Change, Leadership and School Effectiveness/Improvement: Perspectives from South Africa. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, 25 1: 95-112.

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Author Fleisch, Brahm
Christie, Pamela
Title Structural Change, Leadership and School Effectiveness/Improvement: Perspectives from South Africa
Journal name Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0159-6306
1469-3739
Publication date 2004-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/0159630042000178509
Volume 25
Issue 1
Start page 95
End page 112
Total pages 18
Place of publication England
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Subject 330104 Educational Policy, Administration and Management
330106 Comparative Education
Abstract This article comments on leadership within mainstream literature on school effectiveness/improvement, where it is almost always considered to be a factor of change. The article argues that systemic school improvement, particularly for disadvantaged children, is inextricably linked to wider social, economic and political conditions - in South Africa's case, the political transition from apartheid to democratic government. These structural conditions and specific historical contexts are often glossed over in models of school effectiveness/improvement. Through an analysis of dysfunctional and resilient schools as a legacy of apartheid, and of the slow reconstruction of education in the post-apartheid period, the article argues for the importance of political legitimacy and authority in school improvement. The article concludes by suggesting that states in transition require a different theoretical lens in order to understand the impact of wider social changes on schools. In such societies, the establishment of legitimacy and authority is a precondition for sustainable effectiveness and improvement, and this has implications for theorising the role of leadership in school change more generally.
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2005 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Education Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 21 Dec 2007, 13:39:18 EST by Thelma Whitbourne on behalf of School of Education