Responses to interpersonal and physically provoking situations: The utility and application of an observation schedule for school-aged students with and without Attention

Carroll, Annemaree, Houghton, Stephen, Taylor, Myra, West, John and List-Kerz, Michelle (2006) Responses to interpersonal and physically provoking situations: The utility and application of an observation schedule for school-aged students with and without Attention. Educational Psychology, 26 4: 483-498. doi:10.1080/14616710500342424

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Author Carroll, Annemaree
Houghton, Stephen
Taylor, Myra
West, John
List-Kerz, Michelle
Title Responses to interpersonal and physically provoking situations: The utility and application of an observation schedule for school-aged students with and without Attention
Journal name Educational Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-0663
Publication date 2006-08-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/14616710500342424
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 26
Issue 4
Start page 483
End page 498
Editor Karen R. Harris
Art Graesser
Place of publication New York
Publisher McGraw-Hill Book Co
Language eng
Subject 330101 Educational Psychology
330108 Special Education
Abstract The present research describes the development and pilot testing of a new instrument, the Responses to Interpersonal and Physically Provoking Situations Schedule (RIPPS), designed to measure the reactivity of students with and without attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) in the naturalistic setting of the classroom. For this study, 29 pre-service teachers from one university graduate school of education conducted structured observations on two students each, one clinically diagnosed student with AD/HD and the other with no diagnosed disorder, resulting in 58 Year 8-11 students (aged 13-17 years) participating in the study. Each student pair was observed for 40 minutes, with alternating observational blocks of two minutes per student. Observational data in the form of responses to emotionally provoking events and the triggers to the responses were clustered together and systematically coded, resulting in four distinct categories for responses and four distinct categories for triggers. Students with AD/HD exhibited significantly more solitary off-task behaviours, interactional off-task behaviours, and challenging behaviours than their non-AD/HD peers. There were no differences between the students in the perceived severity of responses. For triggers, failure to begin assigned tasks and peer-initiated triggers were the most common, with nearly half of the solitary off-task behaviours being attributed to environmental distractions and over a quarter attributed to teacher behaviours. While the RIPPS is a relatively new instrument, important data have been gathered in ecologically valid contexts and provide the framework for further development of an instrument of this nature.
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Education Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 21 Dec 2007, 13:28:42 EST by Thelma Whitbourne on behalf of School of Education