Adjustment, sibling problems and coping strategies of brothers and sisters of children with autistic spectrum disorders

Ross, Penelope and Cuskelly, Monica (2006) Adjustment, sibling problems and coping strategies of brothers and sisters of children with autistic spectrum disorders. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 31 2: 77-86.


Author Ross, Penelope
Cuskelly, Monica
Title Adjustment, sibling problems and coping strategies of brothers and sisters of children with autistic spectrum disorders
Journal name Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1469-9532
1366-8250
1326-978X
Publication date 2006-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13668250600710864
Volume 31
Issue 2
Start page 77
End page 86
Total pages 10
Editor R. J. Stancliffe
Place of publication Abingdon, England
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject 330108 Special Education
380106 Developmental Psychology and Ageing
750307 Families
C1
Formatted abstract Background Siblings of children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) express more problem behaviours and experience more difficulties in their relationships than do children in families where all children are developing typically. We know little about what contributes to these difficulties.

Method Mothers of a child with ASD completed the Child Behavior Checklist (Achenbach, 1991) with respect to a non-disabled sibling. Siblings responded to a questionnaire tapping their knowledge about their brother or sister's disorder. They reported on problems they had experienced with their brother or sister with ASD and on the coping strategies they had used in response to these events. Problems were classified into 1 of 5 problem types.

Results Aggressive behaviour was the most commonly reported interaction problem and anger was the usual response. Siblings did not generally choose blaming (either self or other) as a coping strategy when facing difficulties with their brother or sister with ASD. Neither coping strategies nor knowledge of ASD were associated with adjustment. Forty percent of non-disabled siblings had scores on the Child Behavior Checklist that placed them in the borderline or clinical range.

Conclusions The current study indicated that siblings of children with ASD are at increased risk of developing internalising behaviour problems. The contributing factors to this outcome are unknown at this point. It is important for research to focus on dynamic variables in the search for these contributors, as they are open to change.
Keyword autism spectrum disorder
ASD
siblings
Disability
Inclusion and Special Educational Needs
Rehabilitation Medicine
Asperger syndrome
coping
adjustment
relationship
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2007 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Education Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 21 Dec 2007, 10:35:31 EST by Thelma Whitbourne on behalf of School of Education