Course design to promote student autonomy and lifelong learning skills: A Japanese example

Gitsaki, Christina (2005). Course design to promote student autonomy and lifelong learning skills: A Japanese example. In: H. Anderson, M. Hobbs, J. Jones-Parry, S. Logan and S. Lotovale, Supporting Independent Learning in the 21st Century: Proceedings of the Independent Learning Association Conference Inaugural – 2005. The 2nd Independent Learning Association Oceania Conference, Auckland, New Zealand, (1-10). 9-12 September 2005.

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Author Gitsaki, Christina
Title of paper Course design to promote student autonomy and lifelong learning skills: A Japanese example
Conference name The 2nd Independent Learning Association Oceania Conference
Conference location Auckland, New Zealand
Conference dates 9-12 September 2005
Proceedings title Supporting Independent Learning in the 21st Century: Proceedings of the Independent Learning Association Conference Inaugural – 2005
Place of Publication Auckland, New Zealand
Publisher Independent Learning Association Oceania
Publication Year 2005
Year available 2005
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISSN 1176-7480
Editor H. Anderson
M. Hobbs
J. Jones-Parry
S. Logan
S. Lotovale
Volume CD-ROM
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Today self-directed learning is more current than ever. Helping learners acquire the skills to direct their learning into the areas they are interested in is an essential part of their education. The educational system in Japan has long been criticized for encouraging rote learning of facts instead of assisting students to actively construct knowledge and take responsibility for their learning – 2 key skills in the creation of self-directed learners. The aim of this paper is two-fold: to outline the design and implementation of a course in Intercultural Communication Skills for 3rd year university students in Japan in an effort to help students master a set of skills and strategies for becoming more autonomous as learners, and to present student feedback on the course activities and skills practiced during the course. A discussion of how the instructional methodology contributed to the development of a set of lifelong learning skills concludes this paper.
Subjects 420102 English as a Second Language
330107 Educational Technology and Media
330399 Professional Development of Teachers not elsewhere classified
E1
380299 Linguistics not elsewhere classified
740300 Higher Education
751005 Communication across languages and cultures
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 20 Dec 2007, 09:55:30 EST by Laura McTaggart on behalf of School of Public Health