Is “Meme” a New “Idea”? Reflections on Aunger

Wilkins, John (2005) Is “Meme” a New “Idea”? Reflections on Aunger. Biology and Philosophy, 20 2-3: 585-598. doi:10.1007/s10539-005-5590-8

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Author Wilkins, John
Title Is “Meme” a New “Idea”? Reflections on Aunger
Journal name Biology and Philosophy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0169-3867
1572-8404
Publication date 2005-03
Year available 2005
Sub-type Review of book, film, TV, video, software, performance, music etc
DOI 10.1007/s10539-005-5590-8
Volume 20
Issue 2-3
Start page 585
End page 598
Total pages 4
Place of publication Dordrecht
Publisher Springer Netherlands
Language eng
Subject 22 Philosophy and Religious Studies
Abstract Memes are an idea whose time has come, again, and again, and again, but which has never really made it beyond metaphor. Anthropologist Robert Aunger’s book The Electric Meme is a new attempt to take it to the next stage, setting up a research program with proper models and theoretical entities. He succeeds partially, with some contributions to the logic of replication, but in the end, his proposal for the substrate of memes is a non-solution to a central problem of memetics.
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes A review of Robert Aunger, The Electric Meme: A New Theory of How We Think, Free Press, New York, 2002, 392 pp., ISBN 0743201507 (alk. paper).

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Review of book, film, TV, video, software, performance, music etc
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry
 
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Created: Thu, 29 Nov 2007, 16:12:09 EST by Bikash Das on behalf of School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry