Does parental attributional retraining and anger management enhance the effects of the triple P-positive parenting program with parents at risk of child maltreatment?

Sanders, Matthew R., Pidgeon, Aileen M., Gravestock, Fred, Connors, Mark D., Brown, Samantha and Young, Ross W. (2004) Does parental attributional retraining and anger management enhance the effects of the triple P-positive parenting program with parents at risk of child maltreatment?. Behavior Therapy, 35 3: 513-535. doi:10.1016/S0005-7894(04)80030-3

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Author Sanders, Matthew R.
Pidgeon, Aileen M.
Gravestock, Fred
Connors, Mark D.
Brown, Samantha
Young, Ross W.
Title Does parental attributional retraining and anger management enhance the effects of the triple P-positive parenting program with parents at risk of child maltreatment?
Journal name Behavior Therapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0005-7894
Publication date 2004
Year available 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0005-7894(04)80030-3
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 35
Issue 3
Start page 513
End page 535
Total pages 23
Editor R. Heimberg
Place of publication New York
Publisher Association for the Advancement of Behavior Therapy
Language eng
Subject 380107 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Abstract Ninety-eight parents experiencing significant difficulties in managing their own anger in their interactions with their preschool-aged children were randomly assigned either to an enhanced group-administered behavioral family intervention program based on the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program that incorporated attributional retraining and anger management (EBFI) or a standard behavioral family intervention program (SBFI) that provided training in parenting skills alone. At post-intervention, both conditions were associated with lower levels of observed and parent-reported disruptive child behavior, lower levels of parent-reported dysfunctional parenting, greater parental self-efficacy, less parental distress, relationship conflict and similarly high levels of consumer satisfaction. EBFI showed a significantly greater short-term improvement on measures of negative parental attributions for children's misbehavior, potential for child abuse and unrealistic parental expectations than SBFI. At 6-month follow-up both conditions showed similarly positive outcomes on all measures of child abuse potential, parent practices, parental adjustment, and child behavior and adjustment; however, EBFI continued to show greater change in negative parental attributions. Implications for tailoring early-intervention programs to the needs of parents at risk of child maltreatment are discussed.
Keyword Child maltreatment
Anger management
Attributional retraining
Behavioral Family Intervention
Parenting
Group Triple P
Pathways Triple P
Level 4 Evidence
Level 5 Evidence
Q-Index Code C1

 
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