Is acamprosate use in alcohol dependence treatment reflected in improved subjective health status outcomes beyond cognitive behavioural therapy alone?

Feeney, Gerald F. X., Connor, Jason P., Young, Ross McD, Tucker, Jane and McPherson, Annie (2006) Is acamprosate use in alcohol dependence treatment reflected in improved subjective health status outcomes beyond cognitive behavioural therapy alone?. Journal of Addictive Diseases, 25 4: 49-58. doi:10.1300/J069v25n04_05


Author Feeney, Gerald F. X.
Connor, Jason P.
Young, Ross McD
Tucker, Jane
McPherson, Annie
Title Is acamprosate use in alcohol dependence treatment reflected in improved subjective health status outcomes beyond cognitive behavioural therapy alone?
Journal name Journal of Addictive Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1055-0887
1545-0848
Publication date 2006-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1300/J069v25n04_05
Volume 25
Issue 4
Start page 49
End page 58
Total pages 10
Editor Barry Stimmel
Place of publication Binghamton
Publisher Haworth Press Inc
Language eng
Subject C1
321021 Psychiatry
730205 Substance abuse
Formatted abstract
Objective.
To examine whether the addition of acamprosate to Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) outpatient alcohol dependence treatment impacted on subjective health status.

Method.
Among 268 patients consecutively treated for alcohol dependence, 149 chose CBT alone. A matched design was used. From a possible pool of 119 Acamprosate + CBT and 149 CBT-only patients, 86 Acamprosate + CBT subjects were individually matched with 86 CBT-only patients on parameters of gender, age, prior detoxification and alcohol dependence severity. Health Status (SF-36) and Psychological Well-Being (GHQ-28) was assessed pre- and post-treatment.

Results.

Pre-treatment, both self-reported health status and psychological well-being was markedly below normative (community) ranges. Program completers significantly improved across both measures over 12 weeks of treatment and some health domains approximated community levels. No treatment group differences were observed.

Conclusions.

Participants who completed the CBT-based treatment showed significant improvement in self-reported health status. The use of acamprosate did not register additional improvement on either SF-36 or GHQ-28, beyond CBT alone.
Keyword Substance Abuse
acamprosate
impact
subjective health
alcoholism
Quality-of-life
Naltrexone
Efficacy
Care
Population
Disorders
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2007 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 17 Oct 2007, 15:27:48 EST