The role of a right fronto-parietal network in cognitive control - Common activations for "cues-to-attend" and response inhibition

Fassbender, C., Simoes-Franklin, C., Murphy, K., Hester, R., Meaney, J., Robertson, I. H. and Garavan, H. (2006) The role of a right fronto-parietal network in cognitive control - Common activations for "cues-to-attend" and response inhibition. Journal of Psychophysiology, 20 4: 286-296. doi:10.1027/0269-8803.20.4.286


Author Fassbender, C.
Simoes-Franklin, C.
Murphy, K.
Hester, R.
Meaney, J.
Robertson, I. H.
Garavan, H.
Title The role of a right fronto-parietal network in cognitive control - Common activations for "cues-to-attend" and response inhibition
Journal name Journal of Psychophysiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0269-8803
2151-2124
Publication date 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1027/0269-8803.20.4.286
Volume 20
Issue 4
Start page 286
End page 296
Total pages 11
Place of publication Cambridge, MA, United States
Publisher Hogrefe Publishing
Language eng
Abstract Seemingly distinct cognitive tasks often activate similar anatomical networks. For example, the right fronto-parietal cortex is active across a wide variety of paradigms suggesting that these regions may subserve a general cognitive function. We utilized fMRI and a GO/NOGO task consisting of two conditions, one with intermittent unpredictive "cues-to-attend" and the other without any "cues-to-attend," in order to investigate areas involved in inhibition of a prepotent response and top-down attentional control. Sixteen subjects (5 male, ages ranging from 20 to 30 years) responded to an alternating sequence of the letters X and Y and withheld responding when the alternating sequence was broken (e.g., when X followed an X). Cues were rare stimulus font-color changes, which were linked to a simple instruction to attend to the task at hand. We hypothesized that inhibitions and cues, despite requiring quite different responses from subjects, might engage similar top-down attentional control processes and would thus share a common network of anatomical substrates. Although inhibitions and cues activated a number of distinct brain regions, a similar network of right dorsolateral prefrontal and inferior parietal regions was active for both. These results suggest that this network, commonly activated for response inhibition, may subserve a more general cognitive control process involved in allocating top-down attentional resources.
Keyword Top-down control
Cues
Right DLPFC
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 17 Oct 2007, 15:21:41 EST