Flexible cognitive control: Effects of individual differences and brief practice on a complex cognitive task

Kelly, A. M. Clare, Hester, Robert, Foxe, John J., Shpaner, Marina and Garavan, Hugh (2006) Flexible cognitive control: Effects of individual differences and brief practice on a complex cognitive task. Neuroimage, 31 2: 866-886. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2006.01.008


Author Kelly, A. M. Clare
Hester, Robert
Foxe, John J.
Shpaner, Marina
Garavan, Hugh
Title Flexible cognitive control: Effects of individual differences and brief practice on a complex cognitive task
Journal name Neuroimage   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1053-8119
1095-9572
Publication date 2006-06
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2006.01.008
Volume 31
Issue 2
Start page 866
End page 886
Total pages 21
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO, United States
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Subject 1103 Clinical Sciences
1702 Cognitive Sciences
1109 Neurosciences
Abstract Brain activations underlying cognitive processes are subject to modulation as a result of increasing cognitive demands, individual differences, and practice. The present study investigated these modulatory effects in a cognitive control task which required inhibition of prepotent responses based on the contents of working memory (WM) and which enabled a novel dissociation of item-specific and task-skill effects resulting from brief practice. Distinct responses in areas underlying WM and inhibitory control in the absence of behavioral changes reflected different effects of item repetition and general task practice on tonic working memory and phasic inhibitory processes. Item repetition was associated with decreases in both unique and common areas subserving WM and inhibitory control. In contrast, general task practice was reflected in decreases in the level of tonic WM activity required to maintain a consistently high level of task performance but increased activity in a number of core inhibitory regions including dorsolateral and inferior PFC and inferior parietal cortex. Furthermore, both practice and individual differences in task performance were associated with the ability to modulate and maintain activity in frontostriatal areas mediating attentional control, suggesting that the areas that differ between individuals can be modulated by practice within an individual. These results raise the possibility that a fundamental human ability, reflexive cognitive control, is amenable to practice. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Keyword Working memory
Inhibition
Flexible cognitive control
Interference
Practice
Performance effects
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 31 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 36 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 17 Oct 2007, 14:52:10 EST