Why we need a population-based approach to clinical indicators for cancer: A case study using microscopic confirmation of lung cancer in Queensland

Coory, M., Fong, K., Bowman, R. and Hall, L. (2006) Why we need a population-based approach to clinical indicators for cancer: A case study using microscopic confirmation of lung cancer in Queensland. Internal Medicine Journal, 36 6: 389-392. doi:10.1111/j.1445-5994.2006.01074.x


Author Coory, M.
Fong, K.
Bowman, R.
Hall, L.
Title Why we need a population-based approach to clinical indicators for cancer: A case study using microscopic confirmation of lung cancer in Queensland
Journal name Internal Medicine Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1444-0903
1445-5994
Publication date 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-5994.2006.01074.x
Volume 36
Issue 6
Start page 389
End page 392
Total pages 4
Place of publication Richmond, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Subject 11 Medical and Health Sciences
Abstract An important function of clinical cancer registries is to provide feedback to clinicians on various performance measures. To date, most clinical cancer registries in Australia are located in tertiary academic hospitals, where adherence to guidelines is probably already high. Microscopic confirmation is an important process measure for lung cancer care. We found that the proportion of patients with lung cancer without microscopic confirmation was much higher in regional public hospitals (27.1%) than in tertiary hospitals (7.5%), and this disparity remained after adjusting for age, sex and comorbidities. The percentage was also higher in the private than in the public sector. This case study shows that we need a population-based approach to measuring clinical indicators that includes regional public hospitals as a matter of priority and should ideally include the private sector.
Keyword Lung cancer
Quality of care
Clinical registry
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 17 Oct 2007, 14:47:09 EST