Long-term weight change and breast cancer risk: the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC)

Lahmann, P. H., Schulz, M., Hoffmann, K., Boeing, H., Tjonneland, A., Olsen, A., Overvad, K., Key, T. J., Allen, N. E., Khaw, K. T., Bingham, S., Berglund, G., Wirfalt, E., Berrino, F., Krogh, V., Trichopoulou, A., Lagiou, P., Trichopoulos, D., Kaaks, R. and Riboli, E. (2005) Long-term weight change and breast cancer risk: the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC). British Journal of Cancer, 93 5: 582-589. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6602763


Author Lahmann, P. H.
Schulz, M.
Hoffmann, K.
Boeing, H.
Tjonneland, A.
Olsen, A.
Overvad, K.
Key, T. J.
Allen, N. E.
Khaw, K. T.
Bingham, S.
Berglund, G.
Wirfalt, E.
Berrino, F.
Krogh, V.
Trichopoulou, A.
Lagiou, P.
Trichopoulos, D.
Kaaks, R.
Riboli, E.
Title Long-term weight change and breast cancer risk: the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC)
Journal name British Journal of Cancer   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0007-0920
1532-1827
Publication date 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/sj.bjc.6602763
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 93
Issue 5
Start page 582
End page 589
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Language eng
Abstract We examined prospectively the association between weight change during adulthood and breast cancer risk, using data on 1358 incident cases that developed during 5.8 years of follow-up among 40 429 premenopausal and 57 923 postmenopausal women from six European countries, taking part in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study. Multivariate Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios according to weight change ( kg), defined as the weight difference between age at enrolment and age 20 adjusted for other risk factors. Changes in weight were not associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk. In postmenopausal women, weight gain was positively associated with breast cancer risk only among noncurrent hormone replacement therapy (HRT) users (P-trend <= 0.0002). Compared to women with a stable weight ( 72 kg), the relative risk for women who gained 15 - 20 kg was 1.50 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06 - 2.13). The pooled RR per weight gain increment of 5 kg was 1.08 ( 95% CI 1.04 - 1.12). Weight gain was not associated with breast cancer risk in current HRT users, although, overall, these women experienced a much higher risk of breast cancer compared with nonusers. Our findings suggest that large adult weight gain was a significant predictor of breast cancer in postmenopausal women not taking exogenous hormones.
Keyword Oncology
Breast neoplasm
Weight gain
Weight history
Obesity
Hormone replacement therapy
Menopausal status
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 17 Oct 2007, 13:53:02 EST