Executive dysfunction in cocaine addiction: Evidence for discordant frontal, cingulate, and cerebellar activity

Hester, R. and Garavan, H. (2004) Executive dysfunction in cocaine addiction: Evidence for discordant frontal, cingulate, and cerebellar activity. Journal of Neuroscience, 24 49: 11017-11022. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3321-04.2004

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Author Hester, R.
Garavan, H.
Title Executive dysfunction in cocaine addiction: Evidence for discordant frontal, cingulate, and cerebellar activity
Journal name Journal of Neuroscience   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0270-6474
Publication date 2004-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3321-04.2004
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 24
Issue 49
Start page 11017
End page 11022
Total pages 6
Place of publication Washington
Publisher Soc Neuroscience
Language eng
Abstract Using a GO-NOGO response inhibition task in which working memory (WM) demands can be varied, we demonstrate that the compromised abilities of cocaine users to exert control over strong prepotent urges are associated with reduced activity in anterior cingulate and right prefrontal cortices, two regions thought to be critical for implementing cognitive control. Furthermore, unlike drug-naive controls, and opposite to the anterior cingulate pattern, cocaine users showed an over-reliance on the left cerebellum, a compensatory pattern previously seen in alcohol addiction. The results indicate that cocaine users find it difficult to inhibit their own actions, particularly when WM demands, which have been shown previously to increase during cue-induced craving for the drug, are increased. The results reveal a neuroanatomical basis for this dysexecutive component to addiction, supporting the suggested importance cognitive functions may play in prolonging abuse or predisposing users toward relapse.
Keyword Neurosciences
cocaine
executive function
response inhibition
working memory
addiction
fMRI
Verbal Working-memory
Event-related Fmri
Response-inhibition
Prefrontal Cortex
Functional Mri
Neuropsychological Performance
Error-detection
Drug-addiction
Rhesus-monkey
Activation
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 304 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 17 Oct 2007, 13:16:03 EST