An investigation of the relationship between free-viewing perceptual asymmetries for vertical and horizontal stimuli

Nicholls, Michael E. R., Mattingley, Jason B., Berberovic, Nadja, Smith, Amanda and Bradshaw, John L. (2004) An investigation of the relationship between free-viewing perceptual asymmetries for vertical and horizontal stimuli. Cognitive Brain Research, 19 3: 289-301. doi:10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2003.12.008


Author Nicholls, Michael E. R.
Mattingley, Jason B.
Berberovic, Nadja
Smith, Amanda
Bradshaw, John L.
Title An investigation of the relationship between free-viewing perceptual asymmetries for vertical and horizontal stimuli
Journal name Cognitive Brain Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0926-6410
Publication date 2004-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2003.12.008
Volume 19
Issue 3
Start page 289
End page 301
Total pages 13
Place of publication Amsterdam
Publisher Elsevier Science Bv
Language eng
Subject 1109 Neurosciences
Abstract Two experiments examine the relationship between free-viewing vertical and horizontal perceptual biases. In Experiment 1, normal participants (n=24) made forced-choice luminance judgments on two mirror-reversed luminance gradients (the 'grayscales' task). The stimuli were presented in vertical, horizontal and oblique ( +/- 45degrees) orientations. Leftward and upward biases were observed in the horizontal and vertical conditions, respectively. In the oblique conditions, leftward and upward biases combined to produce a strong shift of attention away from the lower/right space toward the upper/left. Regression analyses revealed that the oblique biases were the combined product of the vertical and horizontal biases. A lack of correlation between the vertical and horizontal biases, however, suggests they reflect the operation of independent cognitive/neural mechanisms. In Experiment 2, the same stimuli were given to right-hemisphere-lesioned patients with spatial neglect (n = 4). Rightward and upward biases were observed for horizontal and vertical stimuli, respectively. The biases combined to produce a strong shift of attention away from the lower/left space toward the upper/right. While our research demonstrates that vertical and horizontal attentional biases are additive, it also appears that they reflect the operation of independent cognitive/neural mechanisms. Potential applications of these findings to the remediation of spatial neglect are discussed. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keyword Computer Science, Artificial Intelligence
Neurosciences
Neuroimaging
neglect
left
right
pseudoneglect
attention
coordinate frames
Line Bisection Judgments
Lateral Intraparietal Area
Visuospatial Attention
Reading Habits
Visual-field
Unilateral Neglect
Pseudoneglect
Biases
Space
Task
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 35 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 17 Oct 2007, 12:51:48 EST