Trends in melanoma mortality in Australia: 1950-2002 and their implications for melanoma control

Baade, Peter and Coory, Michael (2005) Trends in melanoma mortality in Australia: 1950-2002 and their implications for melanoma control. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 29 4: 383-386. doi:10.1111/j.1467-842X.2005.tb00211.x


Author Baade, Peter
Coory, Michael
Title Trends in melanoma mortality in Australia: 1950-2002 and their implications for melanoma control
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
1753-6405
Publication date 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2005.tb00211.x
Volume 29
Issue 4
Start page 383
End page 386
Total pages 4
Place of publication Richmond VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Subject 321200 Public Health and Health Services
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess whether the stabilisation in melanoma mortality rates observed from 1985 to 1994 has progressed to a statistically significant decrease. METHOD: Joinpoint trends analyses of Australian melanoma mortality data between 1950 and 2002, stratified by age. RESULTS: The latest data showed statistically significant decreases in mortality rates for both men and women younger than 55 years (percentage change per year, men 35-55 years: -2.4%; 95% CI -3.5% -- -1.3%; women: -2.9%; 95% CI -4.7%-- -1.1%). For ages 55-79 years, rates are now stable for both men (+0.3%; 95% CI -0.6%-- +1.1%) and women (-0.5%; 95% CI -1.4%-- +0.4%), whereas previously the rates were increasing. For both men and women 80 years or older, rates have continued their statistically significant increase of 3-4% per year. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Since no similar reductions in incidence have been reported, the most likely cause of the recent statistically significant decreases in mortality is early detection. Although it may be too early to be seeing the full benefits of primary prevention programs that started in the 1980s, they have the potential to lead to large reductions in mortality in the future.
Keyword Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 21 Sep 2007, 10:42:23 EST