Neural oscillations and illusory jitter

Arnold, D. H., Amano, K., Takeda, T. and Johnston, A. (2006). Neural oscillations and illusory jitter. In: Gregory, R. L., Perception. 29th European Conference on Visual Perception, St Petersburg, Russia, (15-15). 20-25 August 2006.

Author Arnold, D. H.
Amano, K.
Takeda, T.
Johnston, A.
Title of paper Neural oscillations and illusory jitter
Conference name 29th European Conference on Visual Perception
Conference location St Petersburg, Russia
Conference dates 20-25 August 2006
Proceedings title Perception   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Perception   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Publication Year 2006
Sub-type Published abstract
Open Access Status Not Open Access
ISSN 0301-0066
1468-4233
Editor Gregory, R. L.
Volume 35
Issue Supplement
Start page 15
End page 15
Total pages 1
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Moving borders defined by small luminance changes (or colour) can appear to jitter at a characteristic frequency when they are placed in close proximity to borders defined by large luminance changes (Arnold and Johnston, 2003 Nature 425 181 - 184). Using psychophysical techniques, we have shown that illusory jitter can be generated when these different motion signals are shown selectively to either eye--implicating a cortical locus for illusory jitter generation. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG) to record brain activity, we have also found that brain oscillations, of the same frequency as the illusory jitter rate, are enhanced when illusory jitter is experienced. This does not occur when observers are exposed to either isolated motion signals defined by small luminance changes (or colour) or to physical jitter of the same frequency as the illusory jitter, suggesting that the enhanced brain activity is related to illusory jitter generation rather than to jitter perception per se. These observations support our hypothesis that this illusory jitter is generated in the cortex by a dynamic feedback circuit. We believe that this circuit periodically corrects for a spatial conflict generated by proximate motion signals that differ in perceived speed.
Keyword jitter
illusions
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Psychology Publications
 
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