The Triple P system: A multi-level, evidence-based, population approach to the prevention and treatment of behavioral and emotional problems in children

Sanders, Matthew R. and Prinz, Ronald J. (2005) The Triple P system: A multi-level, evidence-based, population approach to the prevention and treatment of behavioral and emotional problems in children. The Register Report, 31 42-46.

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Author Sanders, Matthew R.
Prinz, Ronald J.
Title The Triple P system: A multi-level, evidence-based, population approach to the prevention and treatment of behavioral and emotional problems in children
Journal name The Register Report
Publication date 2005
Year available 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 31
Start page 42
End page 46
Total pages 5
Place of publication Washington, DC, U.S.A.
Publisher The National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subject 380107 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Formatted abstract
In this article we describe the rationales, need, configuration, distinctive features, evidence base, and facets of implementation for the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program system of parenting interventions.
Keyword Behavioral family intervention
Population approach
Parenting
Multi-level
Theoretical development of Triple P
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Publication date: Spring 2005.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Theoretical Development of Triple P
 
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Created: Tue, 28 Aug 2007, 10:38:12 EST by Dr James Kirby on behalf of School of Psychology