Self-administered behavioural family intervention for parents of toddlers: Effectiveness and dissemination

Morawska, Alina and Sanders, Matthew R. (2006) Self-administered behavioural family intervention for parents of toddlers: Effectiveness and dissemination. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 44 12: 1839-1848. doi:10.1016/j.brat.2005.11.015

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Author Morawska, Alina
Sanders, Matthew R.
Title Self-administered behavioural family intervention for parents of toddlers: Effectiveness and dissemination
Journal name Behaviour Research and Therapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0005-7967
1873-622X
Publication date 2006-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.brat.2005.11.015
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 44
Issue 12
Start page 1839
End page 1848
Total pages 10
Editor G. T. Wilson
Place of publication Oxford, U.K.
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject 380107 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Formatted abstract
This study examined the effectiveness of a self-administered behavioural family intervention (BFI) for parents of toddlers, within the context of a regular telephone counselling service provider. Telephone counsellors were trained in the delivery of BFI, and 110 mothers of toddlers completed the intervention. There were significant short-term effects of intervention in terms of child behaviour problems and parenting style, parenting confidence and anger. In addition, there were improvements in mother's personal adjustment, and lower levels of parenting conflict. The intervention effects were maintained at 3-month follow-up. The results provide support for the effectiveness of self-administered BFI, and have implications for the population level delivery of behavioural family interventions.

The current study aimed to extend an efficacious self-administered BFI (Triple P—Positive Parenting Program) described extensively by Sanders, Markie–Dadds, Tully, and Bor (2000) into a regular service delivery setting. The effectiveness of telephone-assisted self-directed BFI was assessed within Parentline, an existing telephone counselling and support service for parents. Consistent with the theoretical model espoused by the BFI, the training employed a self-regulatory approach, focused on ensuring practitioners’ ongoing skills and confidence in using the intervention in their day-to-day practice. Practitioners were encouraged to use the training and resources provided to monitor and evaluate their own performance and to seek to problem solve using the acquired skills, to ensure maintenance and generalisation of these competencies. The self-regulatory approach to training is employed in a similar manner by practitioners when working with parents, and is seen as critical to ensuring the long-term success of training of practitioners and parents alike.
Keyword Telephone counselling
Effectiveness
Child behaviour problems
Dissemination
Behavioural family intervention
Self Directed Triple P
Level 4 evidence
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Summary and Author Version attached.

 
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Created: Tue, 28 Aug 2007, 10:24:36 EST by Dr James Kirby on behalf of School of Psychology