Of minds, markets, and machines: How universities might transcend the ideology of commodification

Rooney, David and Hearn, Greg (2000). Of minds, markets, and machines: How universities might transcend the ideology of commodification. In Sohail Inayatullah and Jennifer Gidley (Ed.), The University in Transformation: Global Perspective on the Futures of the University (pp. 91-104) Westport, CT, U.S.A.: Bergin & Garvey.

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Author Rooney, David
Hearn, Greg
Title of chapter Of minds, markets, and machines: How universities might transcend the ideology of commodification
Title of book The University in Transformation: Global Perspective on the Futures of the University
Place of Publication Westport, CT, U.S.A.
Publisher Bergin & Garvey
Publication Year 2000
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
ISBN 9780897897181
0897897188
9780585385891
0585385890
Editor Sohail Inayatullah
Jennifer Gidley
Chapter number 8
Start page 91
End page 104
Total pages 13
Total chapters 20
Collection year 2000
Language eng
Subjects 330107 Educational Technology and Media
220000 Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts - General
330104 Educational Policy, Administration and Management
740301 Higher education
B1
Formatted Abstract/Summary
The future of universities can be posited from an analysis of the three most obvious ingredients which appear destined to be in that future - minds, markets and machines. The characteristics of each of these suggest certain principles that will be implicated in any model of university functionality (but of course, whilst the characteristics of each may be, in theory, quintessential, the understanding of these characteristics is, in fact, clearly ideological). Our analysis attempts to deal with both essentialist characteristics as well as ideological understandings. In doing so, we treat the issues in the order of our title, that is, minds, markets and machines. We deconstruct the ideology behind the current widespread attempts to commodify the outputs of universities and argue for alternative futures based on a more accurate analysis of the essential characteristics of universities.

We argue that markets and technology have privileged a certain ideological view of higher education this is rooted in neoclassical economics and assumptions more suited to the industrial era. A postindustrial economy requires a new view of economics, which places great emphasis on the intellectual capital input into creating value. This necessarily requires challenging the orthodoxy of crude market-forces models in favor of more sophisticated and relevant models of organization for production, and in particular for the production of knowledge.
Copyright © 2000 by Sohail Inayatullah and Jennifer Gidley
Keyword Higher education
Technology
Media
Ideology
Commodification
Q-Index Code B1

Document type: Book Chapter
Collection: UQ Business School Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 09 Feb 2004, 10:00:00 EST by David Rooney on behalf of UQ Business School