Self-administered behavioral family intervention for parents of toddlers: Part I. Efficacy

Morawska, Alina and Sanders, Matthew R. (2006) Self-administered behavioral family intervention for parents of toddlers: Part I. Efficacy. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 74 1: 10-19. doi:10.1037/0022-006X.74.1.10

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MorawskaSanders2006d.pdf Self-administered behavioral family intervention for parents of toddlers: Part I. Efficacy application/pdf 91.49KB 349
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Author Morawska, Alina
Sanders, Matthew R.
Title Self-administered behavioral family intervention for parents of toddlers: Part I. Efficacy
Journal name Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-006X
1939-2117
Publication date 2006-02
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/0022-006X.74.1.10
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 74
Issue 1
Start page 10
End page 19
Total pages 10
Editor A. M. La Greca
Place of publication Washington, DC, U.S.A.
Publisher American Psychological Association
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject 380107 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Formatted abstract
This study examined the efficacy of a self-administered behavioral family intervention for 126 parents of toddlers. The effects of 2 different levels of intensity of the self-administered intervention were contrasted (self-administered alone or self-administered plus brief therapist telephone assistance). The results provide support for the efficacy of the self-administered form of behavioral family intervention. There were significant short-term reductions in reported child behavior problems and improvements in maternal parenting style, parenting confidence, and anger. Families who received minimal therapist assistance made more clinically significant gains compared with families who completed the program with no therapist assistance. The intervention effects were maintained at 6-month follow-up. The implications of the findings for the population-level delivery of behavioral family interventions are discussed.
Keyword Parenting
Child behavior
Self-help
Early intervention
Behavioral family intervention
Self directed Triple P
Level 4 evidence
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Summary and Author Version attached.

 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 63 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 27 Aug 2007, 10:32:57 EST by Dr James Kirby on behalf of School of Psychology