Jealousy in love relations in Greek and Roman literature

Kelly, Michael. (2004). Jealousy in love relations in Greek and Roman literature PhD Thesis, School of History, Philosophy, Religion and Classics, the University of Queensland.

       
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Author Kelly, Michael.
Thesis Title Jealousy in love relations in Greek and Roman literature
School, Centre or Institute School of History, Philosophy, Religion and Classics
Institution the University of Queensland
Publication date 2004
Thesis type PhD Thesis
Supervisor Dr. Trevor Hollingsworth
Total pages 323
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Subjects L
780199 Other
430110 History - Classical Greek and Roman
Formatted abstract

In this thesis I wanted to examine depictions of sexual jealousy in imaginative Greek and Latin literature. Unsurprisingly, further limitations proved to be necessary. I have covered only literature that was written during the millennium that began with Homer, only literature that was written in verse, and of this literature only the genres of epic, tragedy, comedy and mime. In the first chapter, I give the reason for my selection and some points on my method, and I introduce the two basic forms of sexual jealousy. I also state my aims: to examine the use to which an author puts his depictions of sexual jealousy (or notable instances of its absence or deficiency); to examine how his depictions reflect contemporary attitudes and practices; and to discover which of the two views of modern psychology is supported by the ancient literature (some modern psychologists argue that the emotional and behavioural responses to sexual jealousy are primarily governed by genes and biology, but more convincing — and more numerous — are those who attribute these responses primarily to the norms of the sodety in which they arise). The main arguments in support of these two views are set out in the second chapter, in which I also summarise modern findings on such underlying features of sexual jealousy as sexuality and love. Since most modern psychologists convincingly contend that sexual jealousy is primarily governed by social factors, I have devoted the third chapter to setting out the relevant attitudes and practices of Greek and Roman society. In the fourth chapter I deal with epic, examining the literary depictions of sexual jealousy and relating them to my first two aims. The three following chapters deal in the same way and in turn with tragedy, comedy and mime. In the concluding chapter, I draw the imaginative depictions of sexual jealousy together in order to discover which of the two contending psychological views they support. Despite the obvious limitations on the weight that can be placed on their evidence, the depictions of sexual jealousy in ancient epic and drama support the view of those modern psychologists who contend that the emotional and behavioural responses to sexual jealousy are primarily governed by the attitudes and practices of the society in which they arise.

Keyword Jealousy in literature
Greek literature -- Themes, motives
Latin literature -- Themes, motives

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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Created: Fri, 24 Aug 2007, 18:47:46 EST