The Fasu, Papua New Guinea : analysing modes of adaptation through cosmological systems in a context of petroleum extraction

Gilberthorpe, Emma Louise. (2003). The Fasu, Papua New Guinea : analysing modes of adaptation through cosmological systems in a context of petroleum extraction PhD Thesis, School of Social Science, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
THE17527.pdf Full text application/pdf 17.57MB 5
Author Gilberthorpe, Emma Louise.
Thesis Title The Fasu, Papua New Guinea : analysing modes of adaptation through cosmological systems in a context of petroleum extraction
School, Centre or Institute School of Social Science
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2003-09
Thesis type PhD Thesis
Supervisor Goldman, L. R.
Total pages 271
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Subjects L
370300 Anthropology
780107 Studies in human society
Formatted abstract
The influx of resource extraction in Papua New Guinea over the last few decades has instigated a new genre of literature concerned with studies in social change as a result of resource extraction as different from colonisation and missionisation. For the Fasu language group of the fringe highlands, Southern Highlands Province, the operation of a petroleum extraction project over the past decade has brought significant shifts instigated by a system of royalty payments. The effect of the cash influx is manifested in most areas of Fasu sociality particularly within systems of marriage, the exchange economy, and prestige, status, leadership and wealth accumulation. The outcome here is a sociality that reflects a female status quo and male 'development', which appears to reflect distinct characteristics of inequality within the economic system.

However, the Fasu cosmological system determines an opposition of male and female realised through the masculinisation and feminisation of activity and space. Modes of adaptation in the face of petroleum extraction (as was the case in the face of colonisation and missionisation) are culturally salient processes reflecting an egalitarian system of distinct interconnected and interdependent male and female social spheres defined by an ideology of kinship based on perceptions of corporeal constitution. In this study I identify these elements as the locus for diverse modes of adaptation amongst the Fasu. I show how a study of indigenous knowledge illuminating Fasu cosmology can assist in an understanding of the 'how' and 'why' of modes of adaptation in the context of resource extraction. This study demonstrates the ambiguity of 'social change' as an off-shoot of globalisation and emphasises 'adaptation' as a process in which social elements are absorbed and bolted onto already existing systems (see Steward 1967: 24). Cultural idioms are reinforced as the informing features in this analysis of the social effect of resource extraction in Papua New Guinea.
Keyword Papua New Guinea -- Social conditions.
Fasu (Papua New Guinean people) -- Social life and customs.

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 24 Aug 2007, 18:29:00 EST