The influence of memory for prior instances on skill acquisition and transfer in a conflict detection task

Loft, Shayne (2004). The influence of memory for prior instances on skill acquisition and transfer in a conflict detection task PhD Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Loft, Shayne
Thesis Title The influence of memory for prior instances on skill acquisition and transfer in a conflict detection task
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2004
Thesis type PhD Thesis
Supervisor Humphreys, Michael S.
Neal, Andrew
Total pages 255
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Subjects L
380101 Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance
780108 Behavioural and cognitive sciences
Formatted abstract  

The thesis examined the role that memory processes played in relative judgment decision-making in the context of an aircraft conflict detection task. Instance models of learning describe how people use memory for prior instances to perform tasks and were used as the general theoretical framework. An air traffic control (ATC) simulator was developed that presented air traffic scenarios to participants. Participants detected pairs of aircraft that would violate minimum separation in the future (conflicts). Conflict detection required participants to determine the relative arrival times of aircraft at intersection points, a skill known in the literature as relative judgment.

Experiments 1-3 presented aircraft in en route sectors. Participants saw pairs of aircraft repeatedly conflict with each other, or pass safely, before being tested on new aircraft pairs. Performance was influenced by the similarity between aircraft pairs. Detection time was faster when a conflict pair resembled a pair that had repeatedly conflicted. Detection time was slower, and participants missed conflicts, when a conflict pair resembled a pair that had repeatedly passed safely. The findings identify aircraft features used as inputs into the memory decision process and provide an indication of the processes involved in using memory for prior instances in this task.

Transfer of training simulations (Experiments 4 and 5) presented aircraft pairs in isolation for a controlled measurement of the effects of varied practice conditions on transfer. In other task domains, varied practice conditions consistently facilitate transfer. In conflict detection, the ability to transfer relative judgment skill was highly specific to the aircraft pairs presented during training. Individuals preserved information about the features of specific aircraft pairs when making relative judgments. The specificity of transfer has implications for the knowledge representations underlying relative judgments in the conflict detection task.

Keyword Memory
Human information processing
Recollection (Psychology)
Air traffic control -- Human factors

 
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Created: Fri, 24 Aug 2007, 18:27:05 EST