Social democracy and the "failure" of the Accord

Bramble, Tom (2000). Social democracy and the "failure" of the Accord. In Kenneth Wilson, Joanne Bradford and Maree Fitzpatrick (Ed.), Australia in Accord: An Evaluation of the Prices and Incomes Accord in the Hawke-Keating Years (pp. 243-264) Footscray, VIC, Australia: South Pacific Publishing; Workplace Studies Centre, Victoria University.

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Author Bramble, Tom
Title of chapter Social democracy and the "failure" of the Accord
Title of book Australia in Accord: An Evaluation of the Prices and Incomes Accord in the Hawke-Keating Years
Place of Publication Footscray, VIC, Australia
Publisher South Pacific Publishing; Workplace Studies Centre, Victoria University
Publication Year 2000
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
ISBN 9780646408699
0646408690
Editor Kenneth Wilson
Joanne Bradford
Maree Fitzpatrick
Start page 243
End page 264
Total pages 22
Total chapters 18
Collection year 2000
Language eng
Subjects 340207 Labour Economics
340205 Industry Economics and Industrial Organisation
B1
720402 Industrial relations
350203 Industrial Relations
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Most sections of the industrial relations academic community started with favourable impressions of the ALP-ACTU Prices and Incomes Accord. Amongst its keenest and most articulate supporters were academics and unionists writing from an explicitly social democratic perspective. Many argued that the Accord would enable the union movement to break out of its labourist straitjacket to encompass broader political concerns and to develop a social role well beyond the ranks of organised labour. Opponents of the Accord at the time were almost entirely limited to Left organisations outside the Labor and Communist Parties and a minority of right-wing commentators. Since the mid-1980s, however, the mainstream social democratic line of thought has become much more critical of the Accord. Since the demise of the Accord in March 1996, the common theme of many writers is that while the Accord had been a good idea in principle, its implementation had gone awry. The purpose of this article is to critique the social democratic explanation for the "failure" of the Accord to live up to the ideals of many of its earliest supporters. It is important to clarify the issues raised, for what may now appear to be a historical question does in fact have important implications for union policy in coming years.
Keyword Prices and Incomes Accord
Australia
Paul Keating
Bob Hawke
ACTU
ALP
Australian Labor Party
Australian Council of Trade Unions
Trade unions
Q-Index Code B1

Document type: Book Chapter
Collection: UQ Business School Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 16 Mar 2004, 10:00:00 EST