Motivation and performance during skill acquisition : an examination of moderators from two levels of analysis

Yeo, Gillian B. (2003). Motivation and performance during skill acquisition : an examination of moderators from two levels of analysis PhD Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
THE17567.pdf Full text application/pdf 14.97MB 5
Author Yeo, Gillian B.
Thesis Title Motivation and performance during skill acquisition : an examination of moderators from two levels of analysis
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2003
Thesis type PhD Thesis
Supervisor Andrew Neal
Chris Jackson
Total pages 251
Collection year 2003
Language eng
Subjects L
380102 Learning, Memory, Cognition and Language
380101 Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance
Formatted abstract
This thesis examined the relationship between motivation and performance, within the framework of resource allocation theory. Multilevel analyses were used to examine the relationship between effort intensity and task performance throughout practice, and the moderating effects of cognitive ability, conscientiousness and goal orientation. Three simulated air traffic control experiments were carried out. Studies 1 and 2 used a conflict prevention task, and Study 3 used a conflict recognition task. Measures of effort intensity and task performance were taken at repeated intervals for each participant.

In two out of the three studies, the relationship between effort intensity and task performance strengthened throughout practice. Further, by the end of practice in one of these studies, the relationship between effort and performance was stronger for individuals with high cognitive ability or low performance orientation. The effects of conscientiousness varied across studies, and appeared to depend on the type of performance outcome. In Studies 1 and 2, highly conscientious individuals appeared to direct their effort towards useful task behaviours (aircraft speed changes) more so than their counterparts. However, in Study 3, individuals with high conscientiousness learnt to recognise conflicts more slowly than their counterparts. Also in this study, the negative effects associated with a high performance orientation at the end of practice were stronger for individuals who also had a high learning orientation.

This research has demonstrated that resource allocation theory is an effective framework for understanding the factors that influence skill acquisition from different levels of analysis. Overall, these results highlight the importance of adopting a multilevel perspective when investigating the link between effort intensity and task performance. 
Keyword Achievement motivation
Performance

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 24 Aug 2007, 18:12:11 EST