Humpback whale social sounds: Sources levels and response to playback

Noad, M J, Dunlop, R A, Cato, H., Stokes, D, Miller, P. and Biassoni, N. (2006). Humpback whale social sounds: Sources levels and response to playback. In: Acoustical Society of America. Fourth Joint Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America and the Acoustical Society of Japan, Hawaii, (). 28 November - 2 December 2006. doi:10.1121/1.4787051


Author Noad, M J
Dunlop, R A
Cato, H.
Stokes, D
Miller, P.
Biassoni, N.
Title of paper Humpback whale social sounds: Sources levels and response to playback
Conference name Fourth Joint Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America and the Acoustical Society of Japan
Conference location Hawaii
Conference dates 28 November - 2 December 2006
Proceedings title Acoustical Society of America   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication US
Publisher American Institute of Physics
Publication Year 2006
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1121/1.4787051
ISSN 0001-4966
Volume 120
Issue 3012
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Humpback whale ‘‘social sounds’’ appear to be used in communication when whales interact but they have received little study in comparison to the song. During experiments as part of the Humpback whale Acoustics Research Collaboration (HARC), whales migrating past the study site on the east coast of Australia produced a wide range of social sounds. Whales were tracked visually using a theodolite and singers were tracked acoustically using an array of five widely spaced hydrophones. Source levels of social sounds were calculated from the received level of the sounds, corrected for measured propagation loss. Playbacks of social sounds were made using a J11 transducer and the consequent reactions were recorded in terms of the change in direction of the migrating whales in relation to the playback position. In one playback, a DTAG was place on a female with calf. Playback of social sounds resulted in significant changes in the course of the migrating whales, in some cases towards the transducer while in others it was away from the transducer. From the estimates of source levels it is possible to assess the effectiveness of the playback and the range of influence of social sounds. [Work supported by ONR and DSTO.]
Subjects EX
270599 Zoology not elsewhere classified
770302 Living resources (incl. impacts of fishing on non-target species)
Keyword Humpback whale
Social
Sounds
Response
Playback
Q-Index Code EX

 
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Created: Thu, 23 Aug 2007, 22:33:00 EST