The Private Costs of Exposure to Pesticides in Sri Lanka: Estimates from Three Valuation Techniques

Wilson, Clevo (2000) The Private Costs of Exposure to Pesticides in Sri Lanka: Estimates from Three Valuation Techniques. Discussion Paper No. 277, Department of Economics, The University of Queensland.

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Author Wilson, Clevo
Title The Private Costs of Exposure to Pesticides in Sri Lanka: Estimates from Three Valuation Techniques
School, Department or Centre Department of Economics
Institution The University of Queensland
Report Number Discussion Paper No. 277
Publication date 2000-07-01
Subject 340201 Agricultural Economics
Abstract/Summary In this paper, estimates from three valuation techniques are used to show the private costs to farmers in Sri Lanka from exposure to pesticides during handling and spraying. The costs are shown to be large both to the farmers as well as to the country. These costs become all the more important when farmers' incomes vary a great deal due to adverse weather conditions, crop price fluctuations, pests and disease attacks, theft and damage caused by wild animals. All these costs while affecting the welfare of farmers, as well as their families, reflect the extent and severity of exposure to pesticides affecting those around agricultural land, other production processes, wildlife and the environment in general. The study results could be generalised to other developing countries where farmers' exposure to pesticides is a common occurrence.
Keyword pesticides
chemical exposure
health problems
agriculture
farmers

Document type: Department Technical Report
Collection: Discussion Papers (School of Economics)
 
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Created: Tue, 15 Jun 2004, 10:00:00 EST by Belinda Weaver (EA)