Tapping the potential or cramming them in: Developing new tools to assess the suitability and capacity of densification for South East Queensland

Gillen, Mike (2005). Tapping the potential or cramming them in: Developing new tools to assess the suitability and capacity of densification for South East Queensland. In: Professor B. Gleeson and Patrick Troy, SOAC 2005 – Refereed Proceedings. 2nd Bi-Annual National Conference on the State of Australian Cities, Griffith University, Southbank, Brisbane, (1-9). 30 November - 2 December 2005.

Author Gillen, Mike
Title of paper Tapping the potential or cramming them in: Developing new tools to assess the suitability and capacity of densification for South East Queensland
Conference name 2nd Bi-Annual National Conference on the State of Australian Cities
Conference location Griffith University, Southbank, Brisbane
Conference dates 30 November - 2 December 2005
Proceedings title SOAC 2005 – Refereed Proceedings
Place of Publication Nathan, Brisbane
Publisher Griffith University
Publication Year 2005
Sub-type Fully published paper
Editor Professor B. Gleeson
Patrick Troy
Volume 1
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Collection year 2005
Formatted Abstract/Summary
A form of policy consensus has emerged in Australian planning in recent years which
demonstrates all the characteristics of a planning doctrine. The broad thrust of this doctrine is
urban densification and is identified as a solution to a wide range of urban ills. This doctrine
finds expression in metropolitan and local planning strategies in policies for urban consolidation,
activity centres and transit oriented development. Yet, the fine grained implications of such
policies remain under researched with the effectiveness of densification remaining open to
debate.

The Regional Plan for SEQ makes significant reference to the delivery of higher densities as a
means to accommodate growth in a sustainable manner. A number of policy tools are presented
which demand new planning and development responses. Principal among these tools are the
focus on transit oriented development and activity centres. An additional requirement that some
40%-50% of future residential development across the region will occur on infill sites within the
newly identified urban footprint, poses a significant challenge to planning and development
action. At present, however, there is a lack of research in the SEQ context to support and endorse
the use and application of density tools. This poses a significant problem for both the metroregional
planning exercise and for local authorities establishing newly prescribed local growth
management strategies (LGMS).

Amongst the greatest challenges are the process of finding suitable localities with sufficient
capacity for new, higher housing densities and convincing communities of the need for these
higher densities. One principal theme stands out as warranting further research and commentary
if a focus on density is to be more than a rhetorical exercise and this is the development of an
urban housing capacity template to assess the actual physical capacity, economic viability and
urban form implications of increased housing densities in targeted localities.

This paper charts the work in progress of a research project which pilots the use of an urban
housing capacity template in SEQ. The template adopts a set of both quantitative and qualitative
procedures that allow an assessment of the potential and suitability of urban housing
densification in targeted localities.
Subjects E1
310103 Urban and Regional Planning
680100 Planning
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Stream 27 ; The overarching conference meta-themes was: The Sustainability and Vulnerability of Urban Australia.

 
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Created: Thu, 23 Aug 2007, 21:18:20 EST