Gendered dichotomies and segregation patterns in computing jobs in Australia

Whitehouse, G. M. and Diamond, C. (2005). Gendered dichotomies and segregation patterns in computing jobs in Australia. In: Gillian Whitehouse and Chris Diamond, Proceedings of Women, Work and IT: Contemporary perspectives on the reproduction of gender inequality in employment. Women, Work and IT. Contemporary perspectives on the reproduction of gender inequality in employment, Customs House, Brisbane, Queensland, (1-13). 23-24 June 2005.

Author Whitehouse, G. M.
Diamond, C.
Title of paper Gendered dichotomies and segregation patterns in computing jobs in Australia
Conference name Women, Work and IT. Contemporary perspectives on the reproduction of gender inequality in employment
Conference location Customs House, Brisbane, Queensland
Conference dates 23-24 June 2005
Proceedings title Proceedings of Women, Work and IT: Contemporary perspectives on the reproduction of gender inequality in employment
Place of Publication Brisbane, Australia
Publisher School of Political Science & International Studies, Brisbane, Australia
Publication Year 2005
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 1864998148
Editor Gillian Whitehouse
Chris Diamond
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Sex segregation in employment is a phenomenon that can be observed and analysed at different levels, ranging from comparisons between broad classifications by industry or occupation through to finely defined jobs within such classifications. From an aggregate perspective, the contribution of information technology (IT) employment to sex segregation is clear--it remains a highly male-dominated field apparently imbued with the ongoing masculinity of science and technology. While this situation is clearly contrary to hopes of a new industry freed from traditional distinctions between 'men's' and 'women's' work, it comes as little surprise to most feminist and labour studies analysts. An extensive literature documents the persistently masculine culture of IT employment and education (see, among many, Margolis and Fisher 2002; Wajcman 1991; Webster 1996; Wright 1996, 1997), and the idea that new occupations might escape sexism by sidestepping 'old traditions' has been effectively critiqued by writers such as Adam, who notes the fallacy of assuming a spontaneous emergence of equality in new settings (2005: 140).
Subjects EX
360100 Political Science
Q-Index Code EX
Additional Notes Electronic only.

 
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Created: Thu, 23 Aug 2007, 20:36:56 EST