Early intervention for children and their parents following paediatric accidental injury

Kenardy, J., Thompson, K. and Bellamy, N. (2005). Early intervention for children and their parents following paediatric accidental injury. In: M. Innes, 40th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society. 40th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society, Melbourne, Australia, (219-220). 28 Sep - 2 Oct, 2005. doi:10.1080/00049530600940010


Author Kenardy, J.
Thompson, K.
Bellamy, N.
Title of paper Early intervention for children and their parents following paediatric accidental injury
Conference name 40th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 28 Sep - 2 Oct, 2005
Proceedings title 40th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Australian Journal of Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Australia
Publisher Australian Psychological Society
Publication Year 2005
Sub-type Published abstract
DOI 10.1080/00049530600940010
ISSN 0004-9530
Editor M. Innes
Volume 57
Issue Suppl
Start page 219
End page 220
Total pages 2
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Abstract/Summary This study was undertaken to develop and evaluate the efficacy of an early intervention for children who had been injured in an accident. The aim of the intervention was to prevent the development of longterm psychological consequences. Brochures were developed for children, adolescents, and their parents. These brochures detailed common responses to trauma (and normalized such responses), and suggestions for minimizing any post-trauma distress. Participants were children aged 7-15 admitted to hospital for traumatic injury. The intervention was delivered to one of two hospitals, within 72 hours of the trauma. 103 children and parents participated in the study. The parents and children completed structured interviews and questionnaires 2 weeks, 4-6 weeks and 6 months post-trauma. Outcome analyses also indicated that the intervention reduced parental distress at 4-6 weeks post-trauma. The intervention did not impact significantly on child adjustment over this time period. Results of the 6 month follow-up suggested that the intervention resulted in an amelioration of child anxiety from one to six months post-trauma, whereas the controls exhibited an increase in anxiety over this time period. Overall, it was concluded that the early intervention is a simple, practical, and cost-effective method of reducing child and parent distress post-trauma.
Subjects EX
321206 Preventive Medicine
730204 Child health
Keyword Psychology
Multidisciplinary
Q-Index Code EX

 
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Created: Fri, 24 Aug 2007, 06:35:50 EST