Paying for housework: Resources, demand and attitudes

Baxter, J. H. and Hewitt, B. A. (2005). Paying for housework: Resources, demand and attitudes. In: Proceedings: The 9th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference. Families Matter: 9th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne, Australia, (27-27). 9-11 February 2005.


Author Baxter, J. H.
Hewitt, B. A.
Title of paper Paying for housework: Resources, demand and attitudes
Conference name Families Matter: 9th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 9-11 February 2005
Proceedings title Proceedings: The 9th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference
Place of Publication Melbourne, Australia
Publisher Australian Institute of Family Studies
Publication Year 2005
ISBN not found
ISSN not found
Start page 27
End page 27
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary A number of recent studies have suggested that households in western countries are increasingly turning to paid household help to perform a range of domestic tasks formerly carried out by women at home. But while expenditure on meal services, in the form of eating out or buying take out food has undoubtedly increased in recent years, the percentage of households that employ paid help with routine everyday housework activities, such as cleaning, appears to be comparatively low in many western countries. In Australia our data indicate that only 19 per cent of couple households pay someone to do domestic work, and only 11 per cent of couple households employ paid help with routine house cleaning. In this paper we use data from the Negotiating the Life Course survey, 1997 to investigate why some households use paid help with domestic labour while others do not. We examine hypotheses relating to level of resources, level of demand and gender role attitudes. We also examine attitudes about whether paid domestic help is viewed as an efficient strategy for dealing with domestic tasks. We find that although resources, demand and gender role attitudes provide the parameters within which employing household help is made possible or desirable, beliefs about the effectiveness of this strategy are also very significant. The paper concludes that domestic outsourcing is doing little to relieve women's double burden of paid and unpaid work.
Subjects EX
370504 Family and Household Studies
750307 Families
750303 Gender
Q-Index Code EX
Additional Notes Presented during "Session 4f: Work and family". Abstract is available via Conference website.

 
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Created: Thu, 23 Aug 2007, 20:30:48 EST