Collaborative decision-making processes for maintaining biodiversity: Two Australian case studies

Pettit, C. and Pullar, D. V. (2004). Collaborative decision-making processes for maintaining biodiversity: Two Australian case studies. In: Pahl-Wostl, C.; Schmidt, S.; Rizzoli, A.E. and Jakeman and A.J., Transactions of the 2nd Biennial Meeting of the International Environmental Modelling and Software Society. iEMSs 2004 - Complexity and Integrated Resources Management, Osnabruck, Germany, (253-258). 14-17 June 2004.

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Author Pettit, C.
Pullar, D. V.
Title of paper Collaborative decision-making processes for maintaining biodiversity: Two Australian case studies
Conference name iEMSs 2004 - Complexity and Integrated Resources Management
Conference location Osnabruck, Germany
Conference dates 14-17 June 2004
Proceedings title Transactions of the 2nd Biennial Meeting of the International Environmental Modelling and Software Society
Place of Publication Switzerland
Publisher International Environmntal Modelling & Software Soc. (iEMSs)
Publication Year 2004
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 88-900787-1-5
Editor Pahl-Wostl
C.; Schmidt
S.; Rizzoli
A.E. and Jakeman
A.J.
Volume 1
Start page 253
End page 258
Total pages 6
Collection year 2004
Abstract/Summary There have been many models developed by scientists to assist decision-makers in making socio-economic and environmental decisions. It is now recognised that there is a shift in the dominant paradigm to making decisions with stakeholders, rather than making decisions for stakeholders. Our paper investigates two case studies where group model building has been undertaken for maintaining biodiversity in Australia. The first case study focuses on preservation and management of green spaces and biodiversity in metropolitan Melbourne under the umbrella of the Melbourne 2030 planning strategy. A geographical information system is used to collate a number of spatial datasets encompassing a range of cultural and natural assets data layers including: existing open spaces, waterways, threatened fauna and flora, ecological vegetation covers, registered cultural heritage sites, and existing land parcel zoning. Group model building is incorporated into the study through eliciting weightings and ratings of importance for each datasets from urban planners to formulate different urban green system scenarios. The second case study focuses on modelling ecoregions from spatial datasets for the state of Queensland. The modelling combines collaborative expert knowledge and a vast amount of environmental data to build biogeographical classifications of regions. An information elicitation process is used to capture expert knowledge of ecoregions as geographical descriptions, and to transform this into prior probability distributions that characterise regions in terms of environmental variables. This prior information is combined with measured data on the environmental variables within a Bayesian modelling technique to produce the final classified regions. We describe how linked views between descriptive information, mapping and statistical plots are used to decide upon representative regions that satisfy a number of criteria for biodiversity and conservation. This paper discusses the advantages and problems encountered when undertaking group model building. Future research will extend the group model building approach to include interested individuals and community groups.
Subjects E1
310103 Urban and Regional Planning
770500 Urban and Industrial Environment
Q-Index Code E1

 
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Created: Thu, 23 Aug 2007, 20:15:41 EST