The effects of nitrogen application and assimilate availability on engorged pollen production and spikelet sterility in rice

Gunawardena, T. A. and Fukai, S. (2004). The effects of nitrogen application and assimilate availability on engorged pollen production and spikelet sterility in rice. In: T. Fischer, New Directions for a Diverse Planet: Proceedings of the 4th International Crop Science Congress. 4th International Crop Science Congress, Brisbane, Convention Centre, (1-6). 26 September - 1 October 2004.


Author Gunawardena, T. A.
Fukai, S.
Title of paper The effects of nitrogen application and assimilate availability on engorged pollen production and spikelet sterility in rice
Conference name 4th International Crop Science Congress
Conference location Brisbane, Convention Centre
Conference dates 26 September - 1 October 2004
Proceedings title New Directions for a Diverse Planet: Proceedings of the 4th International Crop Science Congress
Place of Publication Gosford
Publisher The Regional Institute Ltd
Publication Year 2004
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 1 920842 21 7
Editor T. Fischer
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Collection year 2004
Abstract/Summary Increased rates of nitrogen fertilizer application lead to increased spikelet sterility. A field experiment was conducted to investigate the effects on engorged pollen production and spikelet sterility, of nitrogen and assimilate availability during microspore development, in two rice cultivars (Doongara and Amaroo) grown under two different water depths. Despite the temperature not being low enough during microspore development to cause spikelet sterility, the number of engorged pollen grains was lower in cv. Doongara than in cv. Amaroo. Nitrogen application decreased the number of engorged pollen grains per anther through increased spikelet density. Nitrogen application increased spikelet sterility as a result of increased panicle density showing pronounced indirect effect of N on spikelet sterility. Engorged pollen number was also closely related (r = -0.636*) to the nitrogen content of the leaf blade, indicating a direct negative effect of plant N status on engorged pollen production. The results suggest that the intrinsic pollen producing ability is the key element in the difference in cold tolerance between the two cultivars, particularly under high N rates. Opening the canopy for increased solar radiation interception by the treated plants increased the level of engorged pollen, indicating the importance of immediate assimilate availability for engorged pollen production. Shading reduced crop growth rate, but did not effect engorged pollen production. There was no effect of variation in assimilates production on spikelet sterility.
Subjects E1
300203 Plant Improvement (Selection, Breeding and Genetic Engineering)
620103 Rice
Q-Index Code E1

 
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Created: Thu, 23 Aug 2007, 20:06:35 EST