Acoustic tracking of humpback whales: Measuring interactions with the acoustic environment

Noad, M. J., Cato, D. H. and Stokes, M. D. (2004). Acoustic tracking of humpback whales: Measuring interactions with the acoustic environment. In: David John Mee, Robert J. Hooker and Ian D. Hillock, Acoustics 2004: Transportation Noise and Vibration - the New Millenium. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australian Acoustical Society. Annual Conference of the Australian Acoustical Society, Surfers Paradise, QLD, Australia, (353-358). 3-5 November 2004.


Author Noad, M. J.
Cato, D. H.
Stokes, M. D.
Title of paper Acoustic tracking of humpback whales: Measuring interactions with the acoustic environment
Conference name Annual Conference of the Australian Acoustical Society
Conference location Surfers Paradise, QLD, Australia
Conference dates 3-5 November 2004
Convener Australian Acoustical Society
Proceedings title Acoustics 2004: Transportation Noise and Vibration - the New Millenium. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australian Acoustical Society
Place of Publication Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia
Publisher Australian Acoustical Society
Publication Year 2004
Year available 2004
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9780909882211
0909882215
9780909882228
0909882223
ISSN 1446-0998
Editor David John Mee
Robert J. Hooker
Ian D. Hillock
Start page 353
End page 358
Total pages 6
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Although there is some knowledge of the characteristics of sounds produced by baleen whales, little is known about the function of these sounds or how these whales interact with their acoustic environment in general. The Humpback whale Acoustic Research Collaboration, or HARC, is a large project that is undertaking a rigorous study of the effects of ambient noise (including conspecific vocalisations) on the behaviour of humpback whales, in the presence and absence of anthropogenic sound sources, off the east coast of Australia. HARC includes participants from Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the Defence Science and Technology Organisation, the University of Queensland, and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. A suite of techniques is being used to examine the whales as they migrate through a study area that is being accurately characterised physically and acoustically. One technique involves the passive acoustic tracking of vocalizing whales and whales involved in energetic surface displays so that reactions to the sounds of conspecifics can be measured. This is beginning to reveal how whales react to acoustic signals from other whales, and that the response may vary depending on the reproductive status of the signaller and listener.
Copyright © 2004 Australian Acoustical Society
Subjects E1
780105 Biological sciences
270702 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)
Keyword Acoustic
Humpback whales
Environment
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 23 Aug 2007, 19:56:10 EST