Improved fallow and live-staking of yam using Gliricidia sepium in Papua New Guinea

Ernest, James and O'Sullivan, Jane (2004). Improved fallow and live-staking of yam using Gliricidia sepium in Papua New Guinea. In: T. Fischer, N. Turner, J. Angus, L. McIntyre, M. Robertson, A. Borrell and D. Lloyd, New Directions for a Diverse Planet: Proceedings of the 4th International Crop Science Congress. 4th International Crop Science Congress, Brisbane, Australia, (1-4). 26 September-1 October 2004.


Author Ernest, James
O'Sullivan, Jane
Title of paper Improved fallow and live-staking of yam using Gliricidia sepium in Papua New Guinea
Formatted title
Improved fallow and live-staking of yam using Gliricidia sepium in Papua New Guinea
Conference name 4th International Crop Science Congress
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 26 September-1 October 2004
Proceedings title New Directions for a Diverse Planet: Proceedings of the 4th International Crop Science Congress
Place of Publication Gosford, N.S.W., Australia
Publisher The Regional Institute
Publication Year 2004
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 1 920842 20 9
1-920842-21-7
Editor T. Fischer
N. Turner
J. Angus
L. McIntyre
M. Robertson
A. Borrell
D. Lloyd
Volume CD
Start page 1
End page 4
Total pages 4
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
A novel agroforestry system using the leguminous tree Gliricidia sepium (Gliricidia) as improved fallow and live stake for yam (Dioscorea spp.) is being evaluated in several locations in Papua New Guinea. The trees are established from pole cuttings directly into degraded grasslands, 8-12 months before planting yam. Gliricidia poles are planted on a 2 x 2 m grid, each tree supporting four yam vines. Data from four trial sites harvested in 2003 showed no difference in yield attributable to staking system, while NPK fertilizer increased yield by 50% (from 18.6 to 27.9 t/ha) on two Bogia District sites, but not on two Markham Valley sites. While positive responses attributable to nutrients contributed by Gliricidia leaf mulch are not yet evident, these preliminary results indicate that, when regularly pruned, the trees do not compete to the detriment of the crop, and can reduce management inputs for weeding and staking. The system may alleviate many of the problems associated with shortened fallows, including weed intensity, decline in soil nutrient availability and organic matter content, and shortage of staking materials. Further benefits to farmers include softer soil texture, and shading of workers at planting and harvest. The trials are continuing to evaluate medium-term impacts on soil and crop. Further long term experiments are needed to assess the system fully.
Subjects E1
300202 Plant Nutrition
620501 Field crops
Keyword Short fallow stabilization
Dioscorea esculenta
Dioscorea rotundata
Q-Index Code E1

 
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Created: Thu, 23 Aug 2007, 19:43:48 EST