A formal framework for modelling and analysing mobile systems

Smith, G. P. (2004). A formal framework for modelling and analysing mobile systems. In: V. Estivill-Castro, Proceedings of the Twenty-Seventh Australasian Computer Science Conference (ACSC'04). The Twenty-Seventh Australasian Computer Science Conference (ACSC'04), Dunedin, New Zealand, (193-202). 18-22 January, 2004.


Author Smith, G. P.
Title of paper A formal framework for modelling and analysing mobile systems
Conference name The Twenty-Seventh Australasian Computer Science Conference (ACSC'04)
Conference location Dunedin, New Zealand
Conference dates 18-22 January, 2004
Proceedings title Proceedings of the Twenty-Seventh Australasian Computer Science Conference (ACSC'04)
Place of Publication Sydney
Publisher Australian Computer Society
Publication Year 2004
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1145/980000/979946/p193-smith.pdf?key1=979946
ISBN 1-920682-05-8
Editor V. Estivill-Castro
Volume 26
Start page 193
End page 202
Total pages 10
Collection year 2004
Abstract/Summary This paper presents a formal framework for modelling and analysing mobile systems. The framework comprises a collection of models of the dominant design paradigms which are readily extended to incorporate details of particular technologies, i.e., programming languages and their run-time support, and applications. The modelling language is Object-Z, an extension of the well-known Z specification language with explicit support for object-oriented concepts. Its support for object orientation makes Object-Z particularly suited to our task. The system structuring techniques offered by object-orientation are well suited to modelling mobile systems. In addition, inheritance and polymorphism allow us to exploit commonalities in mobile systems by defining more complex models in terms of simpler ones.
Subjects E1
280302 Software Engineering
700199 Computer software and services not elsewhere classified
Q-Index Code E1

 
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Created: Thu, 23 Aug 2007, 19:28:48 EST