Customers affective responses to retail servicescapes: An exploratory study

McOmish, Margaret and McColl-Kennedy, Janet R. (2004). Customers affective responses to retail servicescapes: An exploratory study. In: Jim Wiley and Peter Thirkell, Marketing Accountabilities and Responsibilities: ANZMAC 2004 Conference Proceedings. ANZMAC 2004: Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, Wellington, New Zealand, (1-8). 29 November-1 December 2004.


Author McOmish, Margaret
McColl-Kennedy, Janet R.
Title of paper Customers affective responses to retail servicescapes: An exploratory study
Conference name ANZMAC 2004: Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference
Conference location Wellington, New Zealand
Conference dates 29 November-1 December 2004
Proceedings title Marketing Accountabilities and Responsibilities: ANZMAC 2004 Conference Proceedings
Place of Publication Wellington, N.Z.
Publisher ANZMAC
Publication Year 2004
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 0475222151; 9780475122148; 0475122143
Editor Jim Wiley
Peter Thirkell
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
The servicescape has been identified as an important factor in shaping the consumer’s experience in a retail setting (Bitner 1992; Hoffman, Kelley & Chung 2003; Jones 1999; Wakefield & Baker 1998). Yet to date, no study has specifically investigated how the retail servicescape makes customers feel. This is surprising given that millions of dollars are spent by retailers, developers and architects to make the consumer’s shopping experience more pleasurable. This paper presents the results of 42 depth interviews with shoppers in Sydney, Melbourne, and Brisbane providing rich insights into how three different retail servicescapes: shopping centres; inner city shopping precincts; and the street shopping experience, make shoppers feel. Three primary themes emerged:
(1) shopping centres although offering convenience, made shoppers feel a sense of emptiness due to the ‘sameness’, ‘impersonal’ and ‘manufactured’ nature of the physical environment;
(2) the less contrived servicescape of the city centre combining old and new retailers made shoppers feel comfortable in terms of it’s individualistic charm;
(3) shoppers identified with the ‘villagy’ feeling of the street shopping experience reflecting a more traditional community oriented atmosphere.
Subjects E1
350204 Marketing and Market Research
720401 Marketing
Keyword Servicescape
Retailing
Affective response
Q-Index Code E1

 
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Created: Thu, 23 Aug 2007, 19:18:04 EST