Birth weight and risk for noncommunicable chronic diseases (NCDS) in Australian Aborigines (AA)

Hoy, W. E. and Singh, G. (2003). Birth weight and risk for noncommunicable chronic diseases (NCDS) in Australian Aborigines (AA). In: 39th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nephrology. 39th Annual Scientific Meeting of the ANZSN, Perth, Australia, (A81-A81). 31 Aug - 3 Sep 2003. doi:10.1046/j.1440-1797.8.s3.1.x


Author Hoy, W. E.
Singh, G.
Title of paper Birth weight and risk for noncommunicable chronic diseases (NCDS) in Australian Aborigines (AA)
Conference name 39th Annual Scientific Meeting of the ANZSN
Conference location Perth, Australia
Conference dates 31 Aug - 3 Sep 2003
Proceedings title 39th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nephrology   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Nephrology   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Carlton, Vic., Australia
Publisher Blackwell Publishing Asia
Publication Year 2003
Sub-type Published abstract
DOI 10.1046/j.1440-1797.8.s3.1.x
ISSN 1320-5358
Volume 8
Issue Suppl. 3
Start page A81
End page A81
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Background:
Birth weights have historically been low in AA, and they are nowexperiencing an epidemic of NCDs, not adequately explained by traditional riskfactors.

Objective: To evaluate links between low birth weight (LBW, < 2.5 kg) andNCD markers and risk factors in one high risk AA community.Methods: Retrieval of birthweights, first recorded in 1958, in adults in twohealth screens from 1992 to 1996 (n = 328) and 1998–2002 (n = 427).Participants: age 18–43 year, represented 70% of people with available birthweights.
Results: Mean birth weight was 2.69 (0.51) kg and 34% had been LBW. LBWfemales were shorter, lighter and more often had high waist/hip ratio (75.6% vs.50%, p = 0.005) than NBW females. With adjustment for age and weight, theyhad higher levels of dipstick proteinuria (36.1% vs. 17.4%, p = 0.034), overt albuminuria(29.8% vs. 9.2%, p = 0.006), lower GFRs (101.6 vs. 112.3, p = 0.047),top quartile fasting insulin levels (42.3 vs. 6.0, p = 0.013), and, at the secondscreen, higher BPs (SBP 114.8 vs. 108.9, p = 0.003). The population attributablefraction of LBW to overt albuminuria was 31%, to hyperinsulinemia was 40%and to BP ≥ 130/85 was 30%. When present, trends were similar in males, butonly BPs were significantly higher in the LBW group.
Conclusions: LBW predisposes to several NCDs, with stronger effects infemales. The NCD epidemic is explained, in part, by high rates of LBW and arecent vast reduction in infant mortality, producing a large cohort of young LBWadults at high risk. The birth weight effect will be enhanced as the cohort ages.Higher birth weights should ameliorate the NCD epidemic, especially if adultweight can be contained.
Subjects EX
321207 Indigenous Health
730206 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health
1114 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
1117 Public Health and Health Services
Keyword Birth weight
Noncommunicable chronic diseases (NCDS)
Australian Aborigines
Q-Index Code EX
Additional Notes Abstract number 105

 
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Created: Thu, 23 Aug 2007, 19:10:16 EST