Frequently Asked Questions

About

What is UQ eSpace?
Why is it important to submit my publications to UQ eSpace?

Help and Contacts

How do I get help?

Depositing publications

How do I log in?
How do I deposit my publications in UQ eSpace?
How do I deposit publications for HERDC ?
Who can deposit materials in UQ eSpace?
How long will it take until between the submission of missing publications and their appearance in eSpace?
I am a UQ new staff member. What is the best way to deposit my publications into eSpace?
What about my older papers? Can I deposit material even if it is not currently in electronic form?

File Upload

Is there a limit on how large a file I can upload?
Can I upload multimedia?

Author Identifiers

Where do I go for comprehensive information about currently recommended author identifiers?
Can author IDs be recorded and displayed on UQ eSpace?

ResearcherID

What is ResearcherID?
What are the benefits in having a ResearcherID?
How do I get a ResearcherID account and ensure it is linked to UQ eSpace?
I have an existing ResearcherID account, can that be linked to UQ eSpace?
Can I get the publications listed in my ResearcherID account imported to UQ eSpace?
Is ResearcherID linked to UQreSEARCHers?
How does Endnote relate to ResearcherID, is there any link?
Does ResearcherID notify me of new publications which are mine?
What is the Relationship between ResearcherID and UQ eSpace– can data from UQ eSpace be transferred into ResearcherID?
Why is ResearcherID a good thing from the UQ eSpace perspective?
I have added publications to my ResearcherID account but no citation count data is linked. Why is this?
Am I required to have a ResearcherID account?
Is ResearcherID useful as a Research Performance Measurement Tool?

Open Access

Does UQ have an Open Access Policy?
How do I comply with the UQ Open Access Policy?
To prepare my grant application I need to know if my publications are available in an Open Access respository. How do I know this?
What version of my work can I deposit in UQ eSpace to ensure my publication is available open access?
What are the preferred file formats for Open Access deposits?
I am required to 'acknowledge' and link to the journal I published in. How do I do that?
Where do I go for more information about Open Access at UQ?

Copyright

What are the copyright implications for depositing open access publications?
What version of my work can I deposit?

Publications for Q-Index, HERDC and ERA

How do I update my publications for the annual HERDC ?
How do I add a student publication to eSpace?
How do registered Unit Publications Officers add student publications?
Why is a researcher affiliated with a Unit Publication Officer's organisational unit not included in the organisation staff list?
How do registered Unit Publications Officers add publications for staff no longer employed at UQ?
Why does the Q-index code on my record include a 'P'?
Why are there no Q-index points for my publication in Q-index?
How are Q-index codes assigned to records in eSpace?
How can I report a problem with a Q-index code?
Why does my refereed journal article appear as a conference paper in UQ eSpace?
Why am I not able to see my edited book in My UQ eSpace?
Why is my publication not located in the current HERDC collection (e.g. 2014 Official HERDC)?
When is author affiliation processing required on a record in eSpace?
Do I need to request changes to author affiliation processing for ERA/Q-index records?
Why doesn't my article have Q-index points when it is published in a journal on the 2012 ERA Journal List?

NHMRC and ARC Mandates

How do I find out more about the NHMRC and ARC Mandates?

Theses

How do I submit my thesis to eSpace?
Does UQ eSpace hold the full text of all theses listed?
How do I obtain a full text copy of a UQ thesis?
Can I request that the full text of my thesis be made available open access via UQ eSpace?

Research Data Sets and Collections

How do I add my research data to UQ eSpace
What research data does eSpace hold?
Do I have to put a copy of the data into eSpace?
I have my data in an external repository, should I still fill in the data collections form?
Can my research data be linked to related publications?
I want to offer my data as open access, how do I do this?
I only want to offer my data as mediated access, how do I do this?
What are the advantages of describing my research data in eSpace?
Can I edit a record once I have submitted it for approval?

Accessibility

What web address do I use when citing a work found in UQ eSpace?
Where is the repository content indexed?
Is UQ eSpace OAI-compliant?
How do I search for my own work?
Can I generate a bibliography of my work from UQ eSpace?
How can I export my publication list from UQ eSpace?

Digitised materials

What digitised materials does eSpace hold?

Statistics

What statistics does UQ eSpace maintain?
Can I see whether my publications are in the ERA ranked journal and conference lists
How does UQ eSpace count download statistics?
What is Altmetric?

What is UQ eSpace?
UQ eSpace is the single authoritative source for the research outputs of the staff and students of the University of Queensland and is the archival home of UQ Research Higher Degree Theses. UQ eSpace raises the visibility and accessibility of these publications to the wider world and provides data for mandatory Government reporting requirements such as Higher Education Research Data Collection (HERDC) and Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) and for the internal UQ systems such as the Q-Index and UQreSearchers. It also operates as an institutional repository for open access publications and other digitised materials created by the University such as print materials, photographs, audio materials, videos, manuscripts and other original work. For more information about UQ eSpace please read our Scope and Policy document.
Why is it important to submit my publications to UQ eSpace?
As eSpace supplies data for Q-Index, HERDC and ERA, it is critical we have an up to date publication record for each individual researcher and for their School or Centre. This contributes to the accuracy of our submissions and ensures that the University is properly credited to for its research output.

We also encourage staff to deposit open access versions of their work. Depositing open access versions to eSpace can serve to enhance its visibility, accessibility, usage and impact. For more information on the impact of open access materials see the bibliography on the OpCit project website.
How do I get help?
You can contact UQ eSpace on (07) 334 69775. You can also email enquiries to espace@library.uq.edu.au. The Research Information Service Librarian for your school, centre or institute may also be of assistance.
How do I log in?
Click on the LOGIN link from the home page of UQ eSpace, select Login to UQ and enter your UQ ID and password. The system will present your My UQ eSpace page. This page will allow you to view publications that we currently have attributed to you and give you an opportunity to submit information on missing publications.
How do I deposit my publications in UQ eSpace?
The following guide provides researchers with instructions on how to access UQ eSpace, check current publications and submit missing publications. Access the guide here.
How do I deposit publications for HERDC ?
The following guide provides researchers and unit publication officers with instructions on how to access UQ eSpace, check current publications and submit missing publications. Access the guide here.
Who can deposit materials in UQ eSpace?
Current academic staff of the University of Queensland may deposit research. To deposit materials, login to My UQ eSpace and click on Add Missing Publication. This form will allow you to enter the details of missing publications and to attach an open access version of the paper.
How long will it take until between the submission of missing publications and their appearance in eSpace?
All publications submitted through the My UQ eSpace interface are edited by eSpace staff before final publication in eSpace. This is a rigorous process that requires verification of publication details and the addition of a range of information required for various other systems that utilise data from eSpace, such as HERDC, Q-Index and ERA. This is a time consuming activity and can result in a delay of some weeks.
I am a UQ new staff member. What is the best way to deposit my publications into eSpace?
Information for new staff is available here Advice for New Staff.
What about my older papers? Can I deposit material even if it is not currently in electronic form?
Please contact the Manager, UQ eSpace, to discuss the digitisation of research materials.

Is there a limit on how large a file I can upload?
File upload size is currently set at around 60MB. Any file larger than that may cause the system to reject the record, which may cause your data not to be saved by the system. Please consult the Manager, UQ eSpace. if you have large files to deposit. It is possible to arrange for bulk upload of large files.
Can I upload multimedia?
eSpace has content models for digital audio and video resources. The default option is for audio and video files to be available for streaming only. Files are converted to Flash on deposit. If you require your audio or video file to be downloadable, please contact the Manager, UQ eSpace.
Where do I go for comprehensive information about currently recommended author identifiers?
The Author Identifiers page in the UQ Library "Research Publications Impact" Library Guide includes comprehensive information about currently recommended author identifiers and how to set them up.
Can author IDs be recorded and displayed on UQ eSpace?
Yes, UQ eSpace can record your ResearcherID, ScopusID, ORCID Google Scholar and People Australlia IDs Please refer the this documentation for details.
What is ResearcherID?
ResearcherID is a product developed by Thomson Reuters, which is described by them as an online “multi-disciplinary scholarly research community”. Once registered, an academic is assigned a unique ID number that expressly associates them with their published works, regardless of any possible name variations or institutional affiliation changes. Users can update their profile information (role, institution, etc) and build their publication list within their ResearcherID account using Web of Science and ISI Web of Knowledge search services, or by uploading a file (e.g. Endnote).

Users can make their profile public or private, though public is the default setting. This means that the ResearcherID account is available and searchable to anyone with Web access. See http://www.researcherid.com/rid/F-5347-2010 to get an idea of what a ResearcherID public profile looks like.

Academics with a ResearcherID can add their authored publications to a list identified as “My Publications”. It is possible to add records to a ResearcherID account from a variety of sources:
• Web of Science
• Web of Knowledge
• Endnote
With publications added to ResearcherID from Web of Science, the Web of Science citation count is also listed in the ResearcherID publication listing. There are also a variety of simple citation metrics available via ResearcherID including h-index, career citation count, citations per paper and collaboration metrics.
Only records added to ResearcherID accounts from Web of Science (or identified as WoS records) have citation counts. Non-Web of Science records can be added to ReseacherID accounts using the Endnote upload facility. If records that are indexed in Web of Science are added to ResearcherID accounts via the Endnote upload facility, there is some attempt made during the upload process to “match” these to Web of Science, but the matching process is not error-proof. Thus records may be misidentified as WoS records and have citation counts added to them, or they may be not identified as WoS records and therefore have missing citation counts in a RID account.
Within UQ, we recommend adding WoS publications to RID accounts from within the new Web of Science interface. If people wish to add publications that are not indexed within Web of Science, or Web of Knowledge, then the Endnote upload facility can be used for this purpose.
For more information, see the ResearcherID FAQs by Thomson Reuters.
What are the benefits in having a ResearcherID?
ResearcherID gives researchers:
• an easily accessible online presence for their research outputs, including citation counts for their Web of Science indexed publications
• an account which can be taken with them if they leave UQ
• an easy and convenient way to keep track of metrics for their Web of Science indexed publications, including the h-index, collaboration metrics and citing article network information (which are useful when putting together grant applications and applications for tenure and promotion)
• a good way to promote their work, via the use of their ResearcherID or badge in an email signature
• an easy way to get their new Web of Science publications into eSpace rather than having to login to eSpace and either claim them or manually enter the publication details.
Note:
• this is a particular advantage for researchers in disciplines where there is excellent WoS coverage
• for researchers in disciplines where there is “patchy” Web of Science coverage, they would still need to go to eSpace to manually enter their non-Web of Science publications
• for researchers with no Web of Science coverage the benefits are less tangible
How do I get a ResearcherID account and ensure it is linked to UQ eSpace?
Within UQ eSpace it is possible to initiate the registration of a new RID account on behalf of a UQ academic. This is the preferred means of doing this, as we can ensure that the account is linked to your UQ eSpace profile. If you would like to register for a ResearcherID, please send an email to: espace@library.uq.edu.au (RID request in the subject line) and include your uq username (uq login) and full name together with a request that we initiate a ResearcherID account on your behalf.
We will then provide you with a ResearcherID and temporary password, together with instructions on how to finalise the account registration (we cannot finalise the account on behalf of someone else as the ResearcherID account holder needs to accept the End User Licence Agreement with Thomson Reuters).
When a ResearcherID account is linked to UQ eSpace, the RID “badge” can be viewed from the UQ eSpace My Pubs page which provides viewers with a direct link from UQ eSpace to the publicly available ResearcherID profile and publication list.
I have an existing ResearcherID account, can that be linked to UQ eSpace?
Yes, but you need to tell us about your RID account and you need to specify what email address you use in your ResearcherID profile. You also need to ensure that “The University of Queensland” is listed as your institution. If you have a ResearcherID account and want to link it to UQ eSpace, please send an email to espace@library.uq.edu.au requesting this (put RID link request in the subject line) and include your ResearcherID, uq username (uq login) and the email address you have registered your ResearcherID account with (login to ResearcherID to confirm please).
Can I get the publications listed in my ResearcherID account imported to UQ eSpace?
Yes, records added to ResearcherID accounts from Web of Science will be imported into UQ eSpace if the ResearcherID account is linked to your UQ author record within UQ eSpace. If you have a ResearcherID account and want to link it to UQ eSpace, please send an email to espace@library.uq.edu.au requesting this (put RID Link request in the subject line) and include your ResearcherID, uq username (uq login) and the email address you have registered your ResearcherID account with (login to ResearcherID to confirm please).
Points to note:
• we only download publications which are Web of Science records
• we link the name on the publication which matches the name of the RID account holder as recorded in the UQ eSpace author record (as per Aurion), or according to name variants that are listed in your existing UQ eSpace publications.
• we do not import the publication if an UQ eSpace record already exists for that Web of Science record, but we do link the author to it (based on match of name on publication).
• if we download a publication from someone’s ResearcherID account where there is no name match to the ResearcherID account holder’s UQ eSpace name or known name variants, no link to author can be done. This occurs if someone has published under a name which varies from the name we identify them as in UQ eSpace (Aurion), but can also occur if someone is an author listed on a publication as a group author (e.g. consortium member). These publications are downloaded but require manual editing by the UQ eSpace team to link to the author.
• Web of Science publications in linked ResearcherID accounts will be imported into UQ eSpace on a weekly basis (on a Sunday evening), so if you add new Web of Science publications to your ResearcherID account they should appear in UQ eSpace within one week.
• downloaded publications are added to the RID downloads collection http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/collection/UQ:183940
• downloaded records are not “complete” UQ eSpace records, and require significant editing to finalise, including adding Scopus identifier (where relevant), but they are still publicly available for viewing
• The downloaded Researcher records are processed according to the UQ eSpace procedures, with priorities determined by things like HERDC and ERA.
Is ResearcherID linked to UQreSEARCHers?
The publication data available within UQreSEARCHers is provided by UQ eSpace via a nightly feed. Keeping UQ eSpace up to date with your publication details will ensure your UQreSEARCHer publication profile is up-to-date.
If you have a ResearcherID account and you keep it up to date with your Web of Science publications these will be imported to UQ eSpace via a weekly update, and will flow through to UQ ReSEARCHers.
How does Endnote relate to ResearcherID, is there any link?
You can upload an Endnote library to a RID account, but at this stage we recommend not to do this (since publications may not be identified as Web of Science records, and therefore no citation counts will be added to the records). Of course if you have publications which are not in Web of Science or Web of Knowledge, you may wish to add these to your ResearcherID account using the Endnote upload facility.
Does ResearcherID notify me of new publications which are mine?
Researcher does not automatically update your account with new publications authored by you in Web of Science. Every time you publish something that is indexed in Web of Science you need to add the publication to your ResearcherID My Publications list. We recommend doing this from within the new Web of Science interface, which has the option of adding search results to your ResearcherID account – you need to sign into Web of Science using the same login details as for your ResearcherID account for this to work. You can also add publications to your RID account via the “Add pubs” feature within ResearcherID although the search interface is not as good as the new Web of Science search interface (uploading Web of Science records from Endnote is known to cause problems).
What is the Relationship between ResearcherID and UQ eSpace– can data from UQ eSpace be transferred into ResearcherID?
Yes, provided we know about your ResearcherID account. If you wish to set up a ResearcherID account and populate it with your Web of Science indexed publications that are recorded in UQ eSpace we can start this process for you. Please send an email to espace@library.uq.edu.au with your name and uq username (uq login) included, plus the request for starting a ResearcherID account (RID request in the subject line). We will then initiate the account on your behalf and link it to UQ eSpace, and send you the account details for finalising.
If you have a ResearcherID account and you keep it up to date with your Web of Science publications these will be imported to UQ eSpace via a weekly update.
Why is ResearcherID a good thing from the UQ eSpace perspective?
Publications in ResearcherID accounts can be downloaded to UQ eSpace, provided they are Web of Science records (we ONLY import Web of Science records to prevent duplication of publications data within UQ eSpace.)
ResearcherID offers an easy and quick way to get basic publication data into UQ eSpace unambiguously linked to UQ authors. This is particularly advantageous for academics new to UQ if they are in disciplines where their work is indexed in Web of Science.
ResearcherID offers us a way to collect Web of Science publications from UQ academics without having to ask them to go to a UQ system – whilst academics must keep their ResearcherID accounts up to date, it is in their best interest to do so and we derive benefits from that.
When a ResearcherID account is linked to UQ eSpace, the RID “badge” can be viewed from the UQ eSpace My Pubs page which provides viewers with a direct link from UQ eSpace to the publicly available ResearcherID profile and publication list.
I have added publications to my ResearcherID account but no citation count data is linked. Why is this?
Citation metrics information is available ONLY when records on the publication list have been added from the Web of Science. You need to add your publications from either:
1. From within Web of Science: you can add any search result to your ResearcherID account from within the new Web of Science interface provided you sign in to Web of Science using the same login credentials as your ResearcherID account.
2. OR: use the “Add pubs” feature within ResearcherID - search for it in Web of Science within ResearcherID then add it from there rather than from any other database or by uploading from Endnote which is known to cause problems. The interface for searching WoS within the ResearcherID system is quite clunky, and option 1. above is much easier.
If your publications are not indexed in Web of Science (WoS) then they will not have citation counts in ResearcherID. You will only be able to add these non-WoS publications to your ResearcherID account via the upload feature. These non-WoS publications will not be imported into UQ eSpace.
Am I required to have a ResearcherID account?
At this stage there is no UQ-wide mandate for anyone to have a ResearcherID, though there is some encouragement to do so. From a UQ perspective, ResearcherID increases the visibility of UQ researchers, their publications and their citation metrics by making these publicly available.
Further, ResearcherID gives researchers:
• an easily accessible online presence for their research outputs, including citation counts for their Web of Science indexed publications
• an account which can be taken with them if they leave UQ
• an easy and convenient way to keep track of metrics for their Web of Science indexed publications, including the h-index, collaboration metrics and citing article network information (which are useful when putting together grant applications and applications for tenure and promotion)
• a good way to promote their work, via the use of their ResearcherID or badge in an email signature
• an easy way to get their new Web of Science publications into UQ eSpace rather than having to login to UQ eSpace and either claim them in the WoS collection or manually enter the publication details.
Note:
• this is a particular advantage for researchers in disciplines where there is excellent WoS coverage
• for researchers in disciplines where there is “patchy” Web of Science coverage, they would still need to go to UQ eSpace to manually enter their non-Web of Science publications
• for researchers with no Web of Science coverage the benefits are less tangible
Is ResearcherID useful as a Research Performance Measurement Tool?
Because of the citation analysis feature available within ResearcherID, there has been some interest within the academic community to use this as a research performance measurement tool. However there are issues in doing so which limit its applicability for this purpose. Some of these are listed below.
1. The citation analysis feature in ResearcherID calculates the metrics using all Web of Science indexed publications in the My Publications list. There is no scope for refining the analysis to scholarly outputs only (typically journal articles and reviews) and therefore will include listed conference papers, letters, abstracts and editorials. This can be overcome by using the new Web of Science interface, since you can now search for publications linked to a ResearcherID within WoS and then make use of the refine and analyse features.
2. There is no guarantee that the publications listed in the My Publications list are comprehensive, as ResearcherID account holders may choose to be selective about what they include in this list. There is also no guarantee that all of the publications in the My Publications list are actually authored by the ResearcherID account holder, as there are no checks in place to confirm authorship. The incorrect claiming of a publication in the My Publications list may not be obvious or malicious/devious in intent, as it is quite simple to do inadvertently.
3. It is not possible to compare researchers in similar disciplines and at similar stages of their career using ResearcherID given the difficulty in knowing what publications they have chosen to include in their My Publications list.

Not withstanding the above, ResearcherID is a good way for researchers to “prove” their h-index, as the publications which contribute to the index are listed with their respective citation counts. The citation analysis features allow those with a ResearcherID account an easy and convenient way to keep track of metrics for their Web of Science indexed publications, including the h-index, collaboration metrics and citing article network information (which are useful when putting together grant applications and applications for tenure and promotion).
Does UQ have an Open Access Policy?
Yes, UQ does have an Open Access Policy. It is available from the UQ Policy and Procedures Library, 4.20.08 Open Access for UQ Research Outputs. The Policy requires that authors make their publications freely available on line within 12 months of publication.All UQ authors have individual responsibility to ensure that their publications adhere to this policy.
How do I comply with the UQ Open Access Policy?
To meet the requirements of the UQ Open Access Policy, UQ authors have two main options:

1.Attach a version of the published article to the UQ eSpace record for that publication. Publishers rarely allow authors to submit the final published version of an article to an institutional repository. A large percentage of publishers DO allow the submission of the post-print version. UQ eSpace staff will check that the version supplied complies with Publisher’s Open Access policy and will set the appropriate release date.

2.Publish your article in an Open Access journal. The UQ eSpace Team will create a link on the eSpace record that will re-direct to the published article. In this case, you will not need to submit a post-print or published version of your article to UQ eSpace.
To prepare my grant application I need to know if my publications are available in an Open Access respository. How do I know this?
1.Search UQ eSpace to see if your publications are available in the database.

2.Check each publication record to see if there is a link that directs you to the published version of the article or if alternatively, a full-text version of each article is attached to the record. Do not log in with your UQ username and password when you are searching as this only shows UQ staff and student access, rather than Open Access.

3.Deposit your publication metadata and/or a post-print version of your article in UQ eSpace if required.
What version of my work can I deposit in UQ eSpace to ensure my publication is available open access?
UQ eSpace accepts deposit of either the Accepted Version or the Publisher’s PDF however which version, if any, the journal publisher will permit you to deposit will vary from publisher to publisher.

1. The Accepted Version (sometimes called the post-print) is the version following peer review with revisions made but no copyediting or formatting contributed by the publisher.

2. The published article is the version ‘as published’ in the journal (sometimes called the ‘publisher’s PDF’). This version generally includes value added by the publisher, such as hyperlinked references, journal branding, typesetting (into columns) and pagination. Only a small proportion of all publishers will allow this version to be made open access.

To check what version a publisher will allow to be submitted, consult the Sherpa/RoMEO database. Your publisher’s author agreement will identify the publisher's rights and any residual rights of the author(s).
What are the preferred file formats for Open Access deposits?
Adobe PDF, HTML or PostScript are preferred since users require no expensive software to access them. However, any digital format can be uploaded. If your format is unusual, or requires specific software to run, please state this in the Additional Notes field of the record so users will know what they need to do to see and use the work.
I am required to 'acknowledge' and link to the journal I published in. How do I do that?
You can use the Additional Notes field to record any wording the publisher expects you to provide. DOI links can be added in the Add Links section when you add missing publications. UQ eSpace staff will check to ensure that any wording required to satisfy copyright demands is added before the record is made public.
Where do I go for more information about Open Access at UQ?
UQ Library Open Access Library Guide
UQ Library Open Access Service
UQ Library Research Information Service Librarians
What are the copyright implications for depositing open access publications?
You must be the copyright holder of the work to be deposited or otherwise authorised or permitted to deposit the work. Published journal articles are subject to the terms and conditions of the publisher's author agreement. This can usually be found on the journal's website. While such agreements vary in style and format, all will identify the publisher's rights - possibly including the transfer of copyright to them - and any residual rights of the author(s). Many publishers permit authors to post pre-print versions of the published article in a repository like UQ eSpace. Some require their permission to be granted. Some permit a post-print of the refereed version of the article to be posted.

More information on publisher policies on copyright and permissions can be found in the OAKList database and Sherpa/RoMEO. You can also seek advice from Research Information Service Librarians or from the Manager, UQ eSpace
What version of my work can I deposit?
What version, if any, you are permitted to deposit will vary from publisher to publisher. Some major scientific publishers such as Springer-Verlag, Elsevier, Blackwell, and Wiley, allow authors to deposit a post-print in repositories such as ours, provided we credit the publisher and link to the online version, if any, of the article or paper. (A post-print is an author-created, post-refereed version of an article or paper.) Publishers generally do not allow authors to deposit publisher-formatted PDFs in repositories. The ARC and the NHMRC policies require any publications arising from ARC/NHMRC supported research project to be deposited into an open access institutional repository within a twelve month period from the date of publication unless bound by current legal or contractual obligations. We will comply with the publisher deposit conditions and can assist DOIs and links to online versions.
How do I update my publications for the annual HERDC ?
The following guide provides researchers with instructions on how to access UQ eSpace, check current publications and submit missing publications. Access the guide here.
How do I add a student publication to eSpace?
All publications must be added to eSpace via My UQ eSpace. Students do not have access to My UQ eSpace but you can add student publications via your own staff login.
Go to Add Missing Publications, select the appropriate record type and enter the details for the publication, including all of the authors.
Please tell us which author is the student author and provide the student username in the Additional Notes field.
How do registered Unit Publications Officers add student publications?
All publications must be added to eSpace via My UQ eSpace. Students do not have access to My UQ eSpace but you can add student publications via your own staff login. If you are a registered Unit Publications Officer you can also add student publications by acting as one of the current staff co-authors on the publication.
Go to Add Missing Publications, select the appropriate record type and enter the details for the publication, including all of the authors.
Please tell us which author is the student author and provide the student username in the Additional Notes field.
Why is a researcher affiliated with a Unit Publication Officer's organisational unit not included in the organisation staff list?
eSpace organisational staff lists are imported directly from the UQ HR system on a continuous basis. This means that My UQ eSpace staff affiliation reflects current employment status in the HR system. Where staff members are between appointments they do not appear on organisational unit listings in eSpace until a new appointment has been confirmed via HR.

Where staff members have multiple unit affiliations, eSpace assigns them to only one of the registered organisational units. To enable global access, any currently employed staff member can be located by name or username via the 'Select an author to process' search field on the UPO Options page.
How do registered Unit Publications Officers add publications for staff no longer employed at UQ?
All publications must be added to eSpace via My UQ eSpace. Only current staff members have access to My UQ eSpace but you can add publications for staff no longer employed by UQ via your own staff login. If you are a registered Unit Publications Officer you can also add non-current staff publications by acting as one of the current staff co-authors on the publication.
Go to Add Missing Publications, select the appropriate record type and enter the details for the publication, including all of the authors.
Why does the Q-index code on my record include a 'P'?
All records in eSpace are assigned a provisional status at the point of entry to the system. This can be identified by the 'P' attached to the record Q-index code. The ‘P’ is an administrative tag only and will not affect your Q-index points.

Where the 'P' on your Q-index code is replaced by a tick in eSpace , e.g. C1✓, this means that the record has been audited and the code confirmed for HERDC and/or the Q-index. The tick is also an administrative tag and will not affect your Q-index points.
Why are there no Q-index points for my publication in Q-index?
Q-index points are currently assigned to publications with the following codes: A1, B1, C1, E1. Further to this, publications with a C1 code must be on the ERA 2010 ranked journal list to accrue points. Publications with an E1 code must be published in proceedings from conferences on the ERA 2010 ranked conference list to accrue points. Further information about this can be found via the Q-index Help page (logged in users only).

How are Q-index codes assigned to records in eSpace?
Q-index codes are currently assigned according the sub-type selected for a particular document-type. It is our policy to check the publication source for records being processed to ensure that the sub-type selected is correct.


How can I report a problem with a Q-index code?
For records from 2006 onwards, where a sub-type has been incorrectly selected and the Q-index code is incorrect, please provide correction details via the 'Fix' button in My UQ eSpace.

For records from 2006 onwards, where a sub-type has not been selected and the Q-index code does not display, please let us know via the 'Fix' button in My UQ eSpace. Many of these records will also be processed as part of our workflow for ERA.

Q-index codes are not relevant for records prior to 2006, even if they have been assigned, since these do not contribute to Q-index scores or ERA-eligibility. There is no need to report code errors or omissions for these records.
Why does my refereed journal article appear as a conference paper in UQ eSpace?
Where a fully published journal article is published in a conference proceedings issue of a journal, it is eSpace policy to assign a document-type of conference paper to the article. In order for it to be treated subsequently as a journal article for all reporting purposes, including HERDC, ERA and Q-index, we add the journal title to the 'Journal name' field and assign a journal article-type Q-index code, i.e., C1.

The C1 code recognises that the article has been peer-reviewed separately from the conference and allows us to manage and report the paper as a journal article. There are many records like this in eSpace and the reason for this is that we want our records to reflect the actual publication document-type while satisfying the various reporting systems.
Why am I not able to see my edited book in My UQ eSpace?
Currently, My UQ eSpace publication listings only retrieve authored records. You can, however, view edited books, once they have been processed and linked to your established author ID by the eSpace team, via your ‘My Pubs’ page in eSpace. The URL for your My Pubs listing will be: http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/yourusername. For example, see Professor Max Lu.

In order to report errors or omissions about an edited book you would need to send a detailed email, including a link to the eSpace record, to espace@library.uq.edu.au
Why is my publication not located in the current HERDC collection (e.g. 2014 Official HERDC)?
Publications are assessed for HERDC based primarily on research content, followed by the document-type and sub-type. For example, if a piece of research is published as a conference paper, and then later as a journal article with the same title and no substantial revision, it can only be claimed once for HERDC. If claimed initially as a conference paper in these circumstances, it could not then be claimed as a journal article in a subsequent HERDC submission.

In addition, a publication can only be submitted to HERDC if it meets the requirements of research and has been fully published and peer-reviewed in the case of journal articles, conference papers and online books and book chapters, or fully published in a commercially available publication in the case of print-based books and book chapters. Items such as letters to the editor, book reviews, published abstracts, posters, reference entries, text-book entries or handbook sections are examples of publications generally not considered research-based for HERDC. For further information on the HERDC guidelines, see the Research and Innovation Division Bibliographic Data Collection webpage.
When is author affiliation processing required on a record in eSpace?
Author affiliation processing in eSpace is required for HERDC-eligible records only and is based on published bylines. HERDC-eligible records refer to research-based items published in the year prior to the HERDC year, e.g. 2012 publications for the 2013 HERDC. It is important to ensure that author affiliation is accurate and reflects the correct School/Unit claim for a publication so that funding can be correctly distributed via the Budget Contribution Model. Changes to author affiliation in eSpace can be processed for a period after HERDC submission up until funding is distributed for any year.
Do I need to request changes to author affiliation processing for ERA/Q-index records?
Byline author affiliation processing in eSpace is only required for HERDC-eligible records. ERA-eligible records do not require byline author affiliation processing and you do not need to request that author affiliation be added to these records. Records submitted to a previous HERDC must retain author affiliation metadata but this will not be changed or used for ERA or Q-index.
Author affiliation with The University of Queensland on the ERA census date, but not byline author affiliation, is one of the determinants of ERA record eligibility.
Why doesn't my article have Q-index points when it is published in a journal on the 2012 ERA Journal List?
Articles published in a journal on the 2012 ERA Journal List, but not on the 2010 ERA Ranked Journal List, will be listed in Q-index but not assigned Q-index points.

The issue of how to assign 'ranking' to journals on the 2012 ERA Journal List (so that points can be assigned in Q-index) is being discussed by the Office of the PVC (R&I). When this is resolved and workflows established, appropriate points will be assigned to relevant publications in Q-index.
How do I find out more about the NHMRC and ARC Mandates?
The latest NHMRC mandate policy information and compliance guidelines can be found at the NHMRC Dissemination of Research Findings web page.Policy and guidelines on the ARC Mandate can be found at the ARC Open Access Policy web page.The University of Queensland is currently working on procedures and workflows to enable collection and compliance of relevant UQ publications. You can access detailed information about publisher policies regarding deposit of papers into an institutional repository on the Sherpa/Romeo database.

You can also locate information about open access publishing here.
How do I submit my thesis to eSpace?
Students undertaking a Research Higher Degree are required to submit their thesis through eSpace. You can find information about thesis submission and a link to the eSpace submission form on the Graduate School website.
Does UQ eSpace hold the full text of all theses listed?
UQ eSpace holds the full text of some, but not all, of the theses listed in the different Theses collections. The full text of Theses in the following collections are available to the public - UQ Theses Collection (RHD) - Open Access and UQ Theses Collection (non-RHD) - Open Access. The UQ Theses Collection (RHD) – UQ staff and students only and UQ Theses Collection (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only collections are restricted to UQ staff and students and will require a UQ login to access. The further exception to this is the UQ Theses - Citation only collection, which does not have the full text attached.
How do I obtain a full text copy of a UQ thesis?
UQ staff and students should be able to access full text of available theses by logging into eSpace. Others wishing to obtain copies of restricted theses can do so at the Ordering copies of UQ Theses page.
Can I request that the full text of my thesis be made available open access via UQ eSpace?
You can give UQ eSpace permission to make your thesis freely available on the internet by completing and returning this form by either email or fax.
How do I add my research data to UQ eSpace
Detailed instructions can be found in this document.
What research data does eSpace hold?
Research Data created by UQ Researchers, that is made available for Open Access or mediated access.
Do I have to put a copy of the data into eSpace?
No, you can just use the form to describe the data if you’d like. (To collect the metadata for a dataset)
I have my data in an external repository, should I still fill in the data collections form?
Yes, you can fill in the form to collect the metadata, then add a link to the external repository where the actual data is held.
Can my research data be linked to related publications?
Yes, enter the related publications into the appropriate field on the form, and we can link them to the data.
I want to offer my data as open access, how do I do this?
Fill in the form, then upload your data using the link provided. Alternatively provide a link to where the data is stored.
I only want to offer my data as mediated access, how do I do this?
Fill in the data collections form, including contact details, but don’t attach or link to the actual data. People can contact you if they’d like to use the data.
What are the advantages of describing my research data in eSpace?
The description of your data is fed to Research Data Australia, a national collection of metadata describing datasets. This aids discoverability of your research.
Can I edit a record once I have submitted it for approval?
Yes – Go to the ‘My Research Data’ tab and click on the pencil icon next to the record you want to edit.
What web address do I use when citing a work found in UQ eSpace?
All items in the repository have unique identifiers in the following format: http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:nnn where nnn stands for the work's unique ID within the repository. Use that link for citations. To find an address for a citation, browse to the item you want and copy the URL from the address bar of your browser.
Where is the repository content indexed?
The content is indexed in major Internet search engines such as Google and Google Scholar. Content is also harvested by services such as Trove and OAIster.

Is UQ eSpace OAI-compliant?
The Open Archives Initiative (OAI) develops and promotes interoperability standards to facilitate the efficient dissemination of content. UQ eSpace complies with these standards and information about the works deposited in our archive is open access and can be harvested, for example, by Internet search engines or by cross-archive search tools such as OAIster. UQ eSpace's base URL for OAI harvesters is http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/oai.php.

How do I search for my own work?
Use the Advanced Search and enter your name in the Author field. When results appear, click on one of the green links to your name. This will bring up all the records associated with your UQ Author ID. Each UQ author has a unique ID so that you can easily separate your own publications out from other authors of the same name. We also use the AuthorID to credit you with statistical download counts. The ID is linked to your staff Aurion ID.
Can I generate a bibliography of my work from UQ eSpace?
You can simply append your UQ username to the eSpace web address to generate a bibliography of your publications (e.g. http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/vspgreen).

You can also do a Search using your name as the author. Once the search result has listed, click on your name from one of the records to list all records linked to your author ID.

This list can then be displayed in a range of ways including RSS feeds and HTML code. It can also be exported as Word and Excel files. To do this select the desired format from the Display results drop down box.
How can I export my publication list from UQ eSpace?
This can be done by searching for your author ID. Papers can then be output in a range of formats including RSS feeds, XML feeds, Word and Excel files or as HTML to incorporate into other websites. Pick the desired output format from the Display Results drop down list.
What digitised materials does eSpace hold?
UQ eSpace is home to an increasingly rich collection of digitised original and historical materials. These include:

Digilib: Architecture Image Library
Fryer Library materials including photos, ephemera, journals, books
UQ Press archival publications
Queensland Past Online including books, journals and gazettes
Other UQ Library digitised materials
What statistics does UQ eSpace maintain?
UQ eSpace maintains statistical counts for each record view, every full text download and where available includes Web of Science and Scopus counts.
Can I see whether my publications are in the ERA ranked journal and conference lists
Yes, if you log in to eSpace and click on My UQ eSpace, the system will list your publications under My Research showing columns for JR (Ranked journal) and CR (Ranked Conference).
How does UQ eSpace count download statistics?
The aim of UQ eSpace’s download statistics is to show the extent of genuine human interest in the material we showcase within the repository.

UQ eSpace statistics are calculated and updated hourly. Generally, each click on a record counts as a download. A ‘download’ may be of a view of the record’s abstract page or it might be a click to open an open access file attached to that record, e.g. a full text PDF or an image. Please note that some full-text attachments are not publicly accessible. These are described as not publicly available and access will remain restricted for copyright reasons.

Abstract views and full downloads are counted separately, and separate tallies for them are available for each record. Where a record shows counts for abstract views only, this is generally because the record has no attached datastream (or file).

However, there are certain types of access that are not included in final counts. These accesses are collected in logs, since logs record all activity to do with records, but are excluded from final counts. There are two main exclusions from counts:

1. Activity by search engine crawlers, e.g. the Googlebot for Google, and crawlers from other services such as Yahoo!, ninemsn, and so on

2. The exclusion of double clicks is designed to keep statistics as meaningful as possible.

Other exclusions from counts include ‘Bad Requests’, ‘404 File Not Found’ errors, and clicks by people who do not have sufficient rights to view the object in question. Since such clicks would not be successful, they are discounted.
What is Altmetric?
Altmetric collects article level metrics and the online conversations around research on behalf of publishers, institutions and funders, combining a selection of online indicators (both scholarly and non-scholarly) to give a measurement of digital impact and reach. They do this by tracking, collecting and measuring large amounts of data collected from all of the places where scientists, patient advocates, journalists, nurses, engineers and members of the public talk about science online - for example, blogs, Twitter, Facebook, Google+, message boards and mainstream newspapers and magazines. Altmetric allows authors and publishers to see what people are saying about a scholarly paper and can tell them how much attention a paper is receiving relative to their peers. The Altmetric score is a quantitative measure of the attention that a scholarly article has received. By clicking on the Altmetric score for articles in eSpace (this is the number in the column with the coloured donut), you will be taken to the Altmetric page for the article, where you can find details about the score. Only articles published since July 2011 with a doi will have an Altmetric score. More information here.